PDA

View Full Version : Poor Doc


Max Power
11-18-2003, 08:45 AM
Magic Dismiss Rivers, Name Davis Head Coach

Orlando Magic Chief Operating Officer John Weisbrod announced after Monday's loss to the Utah Jazz that Doc Rivers has been dismissed from his position as head coach of the Orlando Magic. Johnny Davis has been named head coach, effective immediately. In addition, the Magic have released assistant coach Dave Wohl.

“We work in a bottom line business,” said Weisbrod. “After a 1-10 start, it is our responsibility to do everything possible to create the best opportunity for success. We are thankful to Doc and are certain he will use this first experience on the bench to become a successful head coach.

“Johnny is an experienced leader,” added Weisbrod. “He is a solid teacher and prides himself on developing talent. We want to give him the opportunity to provide the new voice and direction that our team needs.”

Added General Manager John Gabriel, “With this move there is no less work or responsibility in store for any of us. We will continue to do everything possible to make this team better.”

Rivers, a 13-year NBA veteran as a player, was named the Magic’s head coach on June 7, 1999. He compiled a 171-168 record, while leading the Magic to playoff appearances in each of the last three years. Rivers was named the 1999-2000 NBA Coach of the Year following his first season on the bench.

Davis has spent the past 25 years in the NBA, either in the front office or on the basketball court. He was named assistant coach of the Magic on July 11, 1999 and is in his fifth season in Orlando. Prior to coming to Orlando, Davis served as an assistant coach with the New Jersey Nets from 1997-1999.

Davis has been an assistant coach in the NBA for 12 years, seeing duty with the Atlanta Hawks, Los Angeles Clippers, Portland Trail Blazers and New Jersey. He was also head coach of the Philadelphia 76ers during the 1996-97 campaign.

Selected in the second round (22nd overall) by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1976 NBA Draft, Davis enjoyed a solid career as a player, spending 10 years in the NBA with Portland, Indiana, Atlanta and Cleveland. He averaged 13.9 ppg. and 4.5 apg., while making 82 percent of his free throws. As a rookie, Davis was an integral part of the Trail Blazers run to the 1977 NBA World Championship.

Davis was an outstanding guard at the University of Dayton, where he was inducted into the school’s Basketball Hall of Fame.

Born on October 21, 1955, Davis and his wife, Lezli, have two sons, Reginald and Austin.

bogey
11-18-2003, 08:49 AM
wow.


That team quit on him.

dirno2000
11-18-2003, 08:58 AM
They did quit on him. When he lost T-Mac it was over.

MavsFanFinley
11-18-2003, 09:43 AM
Does Orlando really believe it's going to start winning now? Doc wasn't the problem.

bernardos70
11-18-2003, 10:05 AM
When a player goes for 51 and his team loses, there's a problem. Unfortunately for doc, it is easier to fire a coach than it is to hire an impact player, so Doc goes. I don't think a thing will change in Orlando though.

kingrex
11-18-2003, 10:47 AM
Doc was not the problem, but he was not the solution either. That team quit on their coach. That may not always be the coaches fault (as in this case), but a change was necessary.

There are rumors that Scott Skiles (former Magic guard) will be his replacement.

MavsFanFinley
11-18-2003, 10:18 PM
Scott Skiles would be an excellent replacement.

I was wondering if they would contract Riley?

superheadcat
11-18-2003, 10:32 PM
the team also announced early Tuesday that assistant coach Johnny Davis will take over for Rivers.

Davis, in his fifth season with the Magic, was previously an assistant with New Jersey from 1997-99. He's also been an assistant with Atlanta, the Los Angeles Clippers and Portland.

Davis went 22-60 and missed the playoffs as the head coach of the Philadelphia 76ers in the 1996-97 season.

"Johnny is an experienced leader," Weisbrod said. "He is a solid teacher and prides himself on developing talent. We want to give him the opportunity to provide the new voice and direction that our team needs."

Davis, 48, played 10 years in the NBA, averaging 13.9 points and 4.5 assists per game with Portland, Indiana, Atlanta and Cleveland.
--from AP

LRB
11-18-2003, 11:23 PM
The only good news for this team is that they are destined for the creampuff division next year.

Epitome22
11-20-2003, 11:42 AM
Doc Rivers will hate Grant Hill for the rest of his life

MavKikiNYC
11-20-2003, 01:16 PM
Lucky Doc.

That team doesn't appear to be going anywhere anytime soon, and Rivers was going to be saddled with a malcontent-'superstar'. Rivers will be a top candidate for just about any job that opens up now, and he can afford to be choosy and wait for the best opportunity.

McGrady, otoh, is stuck on a losing team, with the spotlight fully on him now, as well as the responsibility for making or breaking the team. He used to share this responsibility with Rivers since Rivers was there before him, and helped pull off Hill/McGrady. That didn't work out, but at least (from T-Mac's perspective) Rivers was there to take some of the heat. Now it's going to fall on McGrady. Can he handle it? Or will he be just another overrated, stat-making stat-star, who can't get his team over the hump. Does McGrady actually think Johnny Davis (and btw-it's good to see Davis get an opportunity, bad though it be) is going to make any difference?

Talk about dumb.

McGrady may be a great basketball talent, but he sure isn't demonstrating much maturity or intellect.

Now T-Mac...put up or shut up.

MavKikiNYC
11-20-2003, 01:20 PM
Originally posted by: kingrex
Doc was not the problem, but he was not the solution either. That team quit on their coach. That may not always be the coaches fault (as in this case), but a change was necessary.

There are rumors that Scott Skiles (former Magic guard) will be his replacement.

Skiles? Like McGrady is going to respect him.

The Magic were in something of a difficult situation, but when you let a 'superstar' player start dictating who the team leadership will be, you COMPOUND the problem. I don't know that moving McGrady would have been any better situation, although they could probably have gotten considerable assets for him, and started (another) rebuild since the Hill signing failed so miserably.

But now they're stuck--not enough players to win with; and the de-stabilizing loss of a pretty good coach.

kingrex
11-20-2003, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by: MavKikiNYC

Originally posted by: kingrex
Doc was not the problem, but he was not the solution either. That team quit on their coach. That may not always be the coaches fault (as in this case), but a change was necessary.

There are rumors that Scott Skiles (former Magic guard) will be his replacement.

Skiles? Like McGrady is going to respect him.

The Magic were in something of a difficult situation, but when you let a 'superstar' player start dictating who the team leadership will be, you COMPOUND the problem. I don't know that moving McGrady would have been any better situation, although they could probably have gotten considerable assets for him, and started (another) rebuild since the Hill signing failed so miserably.

But now they're stuck--not enough players to win with; and the de-stabilizing loss of a pretty good coach.

I guess they figured they rather have an known quantity since Skiles has been with the organization before.

Who do you think they should get as their next coach?

MavKikiNYC
11-20-2003, 04:17 PM
It's Johnny Davis, isn't it? He's not 'interim' , is he?

I don't know who I think is a good candidate for the Magic. It's going to entail rebuilding around a super-star, with the dilemma of whether to keep him or trade him.

I THINK they are going to have cap issues too, though I don't know specifics and could be wrong.

So what names are out there--Karl? Riley? ......Alvin Gentry? John Lucas?

They might as well ride this tough patch out with Davis, see how he does, and/or wait for someone better to come along.

The problem is, however, that McGrady has tasted the blood of a head coach, and he may never be the same.

dirno2000
11-20-2003, 04:39 PM
The problem is, however, that McGrady has tasted the blood of a head coach, and he may never be the same.

Great line.

I don't know what their cap situation is, but unless it looks pretty rosy that's not an attractive job. They need another star to put with T-Mac. Preferably a PG. Although he’s played ok so far, you aren’t going anywhere with Tyrone Lou as your starting point guard.

MavsFanatik33
11-21-2003, 08:48 AM
Poor Doc?.... Poor t-mac.

He scores so many points a game and still they suck. I feel so bad for him...did you hear the TNT analysts talking about MJ. If Michael Jordan would have not won all those titles and would have been on a Orlando type team...would he still be considered the greatest player to ever live?

MavKikiNYC
11-21-2003, 09:04 AM
He scores so many points a game and still they suck.

Or is this the problem? Not sure if it was Smith or Barkley who said it, but one of them commented that T-Mac looked great himself, but didn't always produce at key points in the game, and didn't always necessarily raise the level of play of his teammates.

MavsFanatik33
11-21-2003, 09:08 AM
Yes, but he's not the point guard of the team, who's job is to make everyone else better. He is the captain, and yes he should contribute to his teammates, but he's doing all he can to the team. I continue to see him throw the ball down low to Gooden or Howard and they throw it right back to him for the outside shot.
Michael Jordan had Pippen and many others who could hit the shot to help the team. If T-MAC had this would he get even more credit than he does now?

MavKikiNYC
11-21-2003, 02:06 PM
Sorry, MF33, but it doesn't really have that much to do with whether he's a PG or not. A large part of being a superstar is defined by the extent to which you elevate the play of your teammates.

Jordan wasn't a PG, but he made his teammates better. Bird wasn't a PG, but he made his teammates better. Duncan isn't a PG, but he makes his teammates better. Magic was a revolutionary form of PG, but it was the fact that he elevated his teammates' games that made him regarded as an all-time great. Same with Jason Kidd--individually, some of his box score lines can look pretty average, but he's the best PG in the league today, because he gets the other guys on the court to play better, both individually and collectively.

I think that a some of the same harsh spotlight that has previously been reserved almost exclusively for Kobe may start to fall on T-Mac. Unless his teams start to win, and unless it is the perception that T-Mac makes J-Ho and Gooden play better, he's going to begin to be regarded as a me-first player, primarily concerned with getting his stats--and perhaps eventually as an underachiever.

kingrex
11-21-2003, 02:27 PM
Tmac has proven he can be superstar scorer in this league, now it is time to move to the next level. He needs to play like the franchise player he is. This team also needs to discover how they fit in with McGrady. How can they position themselves so that it aids McGrady in either making a better shot or receiving a pass from him. They can't just stand around and wait for Tmac to carrying them. Having said that, Tmac must try to get his teammates involved when he gets double-teamed and/or beat his man to the basket when he isn't.

MavKikiNYC
11-21-2003, 06:20 PM
Rivers Hired as Lead Analyst by ABC
By RICHARD SANDOMIR

Published: November 21, 2003

Doc Rivers was hired yesterday by ABC Sports as the lead analyst for its National Basketball Association broadcasts. Rivers, who was fired Monday as the coach of the Orlando Magic after a 1-10 start, will work with Al Michaels on select regular-season games and the playoffs, and with Brad Nessler on other games.

Hiring Rivers ends ABC's search for a new voice, or voices, to replace Bill Walton and Tom Tolbert. Rivers is expected to be the only analyst working on ABC's lead games in a schedule that begins with the prime-time Rockets-Lakers matchup Dec. 25.


WOO-HOO!....WOO-FREAKIN'-HOO! ....No more Walton! No more Tolbert! I think Doc Rivers may become a hero.

kingrex
11-21-2003, 06:41 PM
I don't think we will lose Walton and Tolbert that easily, I'm afraid.

MavsFanatik33
11-21-2003, 11:46 PM
If this means that Walton is no longer an announcer, then this is sweet...

MavKikiNYC
12-11-2003, 06:39 PM
Losses dim T-Mac's star status

By Sam Smith
Special to ESPN.com

Long losing streaks, like that endured by the Orlando Magic until Monday's win over the Phoenix Suns, are devastating. It cost Doc Rivers his job and threatens the job and reputation of general manager John Gabriel. It chased away fans and brought national ridicule. It also turned Tracy McGrady from a great player to a great talent.


<u>Because the teams of great players don't lose 19 consecutive games.</u>


Only four teams in NBA history have lost more consecutive games in one season than the Magic did. They were the 1995-96 Grizzlies, the 1997-98 Nuggets, the 1972-73 76ers and the 1993-94 Mavericks. It won't take long to check: There was no Hall of Famer or future Hall of Famer on any of those teams. Should McGrady get to the Basketball Hall of Fame, which many have predicted with the impressive start to his career, he would be without peer. Because no great player has ever been through that bad of a stretch.


Which raises the question: If McGrady is so great, how could he let the Magic lose 19 straight games?


It's the question that was most asked around the NBA during the Magic's streak.


And the answer is fairly simple. McGrady is a great talent, not a great player. He has great abilities, but he's missing that intangible which the truly great ones have, the one the media and public explain in clich&eacute;s -- the fire in his belly that won't let them lose. [Editoral comment: How many young stars does this refer to? Any Mavericks? Can the right kind of coaching bring this out in a player? Are some coaches better at making STARS out of great TALENTS? Just askin'....]



T-Mac will be the greatest ever ... to have lost 19 straight.
Forget Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Isiah Thomas. Can you imagine a Kobe Bryant team, even without Shaquille O'Neal, losing 19 straight? You figure he'd just do something to win a game somewhere along the way.


It's ironic because this is what we thought about Vince Carter, who seems more comfortable now than ever. Carter, with Toronto's acquisition of Jalen Rose and Donyell Marshall, can float around most of the game and then produce at big moments. That was the plan when McGrady was drafted by the Raptors. We all know the story, of how McGrady wanted out of Carter's shadow, wanted his own team and wanted to be "The Man." Funny how they all want to be the man while remaining kids for so long.


It's what McGrady is -- a kid. He faced the crisis of his basketball life during the losing streak and the collapse of the Magic, and he froze. He didn't know what to do or whether he could do anything to change it. It was sad to watch McGrady play the last few weeks. Once energized on defense, he was casual. He ran the perimeter looking for shots. He's so good he could make many of them and still average more than 20 points. He rarely went into the post to demand the ball or attacked the basket. He took the easy way out.


He's never been known as a hard worker off the court or in the offseason, which is why they feel around the Magic organization he's had those troublesome back problems. He didn't seem to want to work at this losing streak as well.


Meanwhile, back north of the border, McGrady's departure from the Raptors was the worst thing to happen to the franchise, Carter and McGrady. It's not unlike Stephon Marbury's ill-advised jump to the New Jersey Nets and away from Kevin Garnett. Those two could have been one of the league's great pairs and both would be talking about competing for championships instead of making the second round of the playoffs.


Carter and McGrady would have been something to see. It still would have been Carter's team, as those things go. But Carter really doesn't want the responsibility of carrying a team. He is too unselfish for true greatness. McGrady could have had the major role, but he would have had to defer perhaps down the stretch in games and then in interviews. His ego and youth wouldn't allow it. So both, like Garnett and Marbury, dream about the second round.


Garnett, like McGrady, hasn't been past the first round of the playoffs. But don't doubt his greatness. Sometimes the opposition is just too good. Sometimes you're born at the wrong time, like Karl Malone and Charles Barkley when Michael Jordan happened to be playing. And how many titles would Hakeem Olajuwon have if Jordan didn't take a break? Or Dominique Wilkens when Larry Bird was around, or Clyde Drexler and Buck Williams when Magic Johnson and the Lakers were around.


Garnett has been kept from going anywhere in the playoffs, but that's mostly been because of Tim Duncan and Shaq. McGrady has been stymied by Glenn Robinson, Baron Davis and Chauncey Billups. It doesn't diminish him, but it suggests he's not quite where we all put him.


He faced the crisis of his basketball life during the losing streak and the collapse of the Magic, and he froze. He didn't know what to do or whether he could do anything to change it.

There are other factors at work for McGrady these days, though.


It's pretty clear the Magic is a team that doesn't complement him and one he doesn't seem to feel comfortable with. McGrady was close with Mike Miller, who was traded for the somewhat goofy Drew Gooden. McGrady also was said to be fond of Darrell Armstrong, who was forced out by Rivers, whose move couldn't have endeared him to McGrady.


More significantly, Miller and Armstrong complemented McGrady's game. McGrady could penetrate and then find one of the perimeter shooters in Miller or Armstrong. And Armstrong, especially, could penetrate and take pressure off McGrady. Plus, Rivers ran a system of play well suited to McGrady by spreading the floor with drivers and shooters. The Magic was woefully weak up front and the consensus was without adding Gooden they probably wouldn't have made the playoffs last season, when they were on the verge of advancing to the second round after taking a 3-1 lead on Detroit. Too bad it was the first season of the seven-game, first-round series.


But Gooden and free-agent signee Juwan Howard are interior players who don't do much to free McGrady. Tyronn Lue isn't the kind of point guard to break down the defense. One gets the feeling while watching the Magic that McGrady has just thrown up his hands in exasperation and accepted the fate of the team.


It's not what the great players do. They find a way to get it done, to get that game, instead of surrendering to the distractions and frustrations. McGrady did this time. But let's also remember, he's just 24, the same age Jordan was entering his third NBA season and searching for his first trip to the playoffs' second round. The kids who come out of high school are asked to mature quickly when, in fact, they're likely to take much longer. They've all had it much too easy in basketball with too little discipline and when the times or situations demand more, they often struggle.


McGrady is going through his trial now. It may well make him into the star people suggested he was. He's proved he's not there yet, but the distinction isn't out of reach.