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V
08-31-2004, 10:48 PM
World's best alumni shoot for charity
BY BRIAN MACPHERSON
SENIOR WRITER
August 30, 2004

Vince Carter's first attempt at an alley-oop slam from Jeff McInnis met the back of the rim with almost enough force to propel it to the North Carolina bench.

But three minutes later, with the public-address announcer and several thousand fans urging him on, Carter took a McInnis pass off the backboard and threw down a one-handed dunk that brought the entire crowd to its feet.

Carter's theatrics helped the North Carolina alumni basketball team hold off a late surge by the ACC alumni team and win The World's Greatest Alumni Game by a score of 138-126 on Saturday at the Smith Center.

"It was a great game," said Jerry Stackhouse, who hosted the game for the third consecutive year. "The ACC stars tried to come at us a little bit, so we had to tighten up, but I thought it was a great game. Everybody was having fun."

Proceeds from ticket sales benefited the Triple Threat Foundation and the American Diabetes Association, a cause

especially meaningful to Stackhouse, who lost two sisters to the disease.

His passion for finding a cure led to the creation of an annual game that has brought some of the best players in North Carolina history back to Chapel Hill for three consecutive years.

"It's a good cause, and it's Carolina basketball," said Brendan Haywood. "That's always a family atmosphere, and that's something you always want to come back to."

ACC team members included Duke's Chris Duhon and Casey Sanders, Wake Forest's Josh Howard and Maryland's Steve Blake.

The game began slowly, as each team struggled to find a rhythm. Carter electrified the crowd with several two-handed dunks in the first quarter, but Blake kept his team in the game with two 3-pointers.

Duhon earned his first rude reception when he stole the ball from Derek Phelps and drained a layup. A grin spread across his face as boos rained down from the partisan crowd.

Rasheed Wallace, wearing street clothes, wandered out to the North Carolina bench midway through the second quarter and received a lively ovation. Minutes later, Joseph Forte emerged from the tunnel wearing a practice uniform, and he immediately connected with George Lynch on a successful give-and-go.

The ACC stars kept the game close throughout. They trailed by just five at intermission, and they continued to chip away at the North Carolina lead in the second half.

They did manage to tie the game early in the fourth quarter. But after Antawn Jamison hit a jumper, he stole the inbounds pass and scored again to give North Carolina a lead it would not relinquish.

"We don't take it seriously until the fourth quarter," McInnis said. "They start talking when the fourth quarter comes up, and we're ready to play. We know we're going to win the game."

The ACC stars continued to battle, though. Former N.C. State star Chucky Brown, razzed earlier for threatening to become the first player in history to foul out of a charity game, betrayed the effort he'd given while standing in place under his own basket as play continued at the other end.

"Goddamn, I'm tired," he said.

And with the game's outcome no longer in doubt, Jamison and Carter brought back fond memories for the Smith Center crowd with huge dunks.

"That's what the crowd wanted," Carter said. "I just came out here to play and give them what they wanted."

V
08-31-2004, 10:49 PM
http://media.dailytarheel.com/vimages/shared/vnews/stories/41331d8cdddfd-97-1.jpg


DTH PHOTOS/Laura Morton
Top: Former Wake Forest forward Josh Howard (5), playing for the ACC Alumni in the World's Greatest Alumni Game, attempts to avoid a block by ex-Tar Heel Brendan Haywood (15) in the North Carolina Alumni's 138-126 victory. Bottom: Jerry Stackhouse (left), host of the third-annual charity event, looks to drive past former N.C. State star Chucky Brown.

sike
08-31-2004, 10:52 PM
that guy can lead like a madman!

MavsFanFinley
08-31-2004, 10:56 PM
http://www.uncbasketball.com/ic/alumni04/1.JPG

http://www.uncbasketball.com/ic/alumni04/16.JPG

http://www.uncbasketball.com/ic/alumni04/19.JPG

Male30Dan
08-31-2004, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by: V
http://media.dailytarheel.com/vimages/shared/vnews/stories/41331d8cdddfd-97-1.jpg


DTH PHOTOS/Laura Morton
Top: Former Wake Forest forward Josh Howard (5), playing for the ACC Alumni in the World's Greatest Alumni Game, attempts to avoid a block by ex-Tar Heel Brendan Haywood (15) in the North Carolina Alumni's 138-126 victory. Bottom: Jerry Stackhouse (left), host of the third-annual charity event, looks to drive past former N.C. State star Chucky Brown.



While that caption says that #15 is Haywood, he SURE DOES look like Jamison to me... Oops!

sike
08-31-2004, 11:02 PM
its AJ for sure....

V2M
08-31-2004, 11:03 PM
I'd love to see the scorecard for that game. Talk 'bout a mismatch: McInnis/Stack/Carter/Jamison/Haywood VS. JHo + 4 guys I've never heard of

sike
08-31-2004, 11:03 PM
Stack looks like hes bringing it hard!

V
08-31-2004, 11:05 PM
NEW YORK, June 19 -- [Dallas Mavericks] guard Jerry Stackhouse is the recipient of the NBA Community Assist Award for the month of May. An eight-year NBA veteran, Stackhouse joined the Wizards this past season and made an immediate impact on the Washington, D.C. community, and will become only the second NBA player to receive the Community Assist Award twice (he received the award in October 2001 while with the Detroit Pistons).

Stackhouse will be presented this weekend with the David Robinson Plaque at HealthFest 2003, the world’s largest Biotechnology Industry event in recognition of his community outreach.

Stackhouse has been particularly involved in the area of diabetes research, an issue that affects him personally. He has lost two sisters to complications of the disease and both of his parents are currently living with diabetes. In honor of his many community contributions, the Washington, D.C. Father’s Day Council named Stackhouse the 2003 Father of the Year at their recent annual dinner. In partnership with the American Diabetes Association, the National Father’s Day Council has raised close to $4 million over the past 18 years for diabetes research.

In addition, last month Stackhouse presented the George and Minnie Stackhouse Scholarships at his former high school, Kinston High in Kinston, N.C. in honor of his parents for the second consecutive year. At the school’s senior awards ceremony, he bestowed the need-based scholarships to students from the men’s and women’s basketball teams who were in good academic standing and display positive citizenship at all times.

Stackhouse has also established the Triple Threat Foundation to focus on raising awareness about the seriousness of diabetes. Founded in May 2002, the foundation ensures that funds are available for continued research, care and clinics as well as education and awareness programs related to diabetes. The foundation works with the Joslin Center in Boston, Mass. to provide young people with the activities, products and resources they need to lead an active and healthy life.

"I want to help people because I think it’s the right thing to do," Stackhouse said. "When people come up to me and say thanks, it tells me I’m touching people in a positive way. I have been blessed with so much that it wouldn’t be right if I did not pass my blessings on to others. That’s what we’re all supposed to do."

The other nominee for May’s Community Assist Award was the San Antonio Spurs’ Manu Ginobili. Stackhouse joins the New York Knicks’ Allan Houston (April), Orlando Magic’s Darrell Armstrong (March), Sacramento Kings’ Chris Webber (February), San Antonio Spurs’ Malik Rose (January), Detroit Pistons’ Michael Curry (December), Dallas Mavericks’ Michael Finley (November) and Philadelphia 76ers’ Todd MacCulloch (October) in the Community Assist Award winners’ circle for the 2002-03 NBA season.

As the recipient of the NBA Community Assist Award, Stackhouse will receive the David Robinson Plaque, with the inscription "Following the standard set by NBA Legend David Robinson who improved the community piece by piece." On March 23rd, NBA Commissioner David Stern presented San Antonio Spurs center David Robinson with an honorary plaque and announced that all future winners of the NBA Community Assist Award would receive the David Robinson Plaque.

The NBA Community Assist Award is given out monthly by the league to recognize players for their charitable efforts. The award honors the NBA player who reflects the passion that the league and its players have for their communities. All 29 NBA teams are able to nominate a player for the award each month.

The NBA, its teams and players are committed to programs that improve the quality of life for all people and has created and implemented programs that address important social issues, with a special emphasis on reading and online literacy initiatives for children. The NBA and its 29 teams make a difference in North America through the Read to Achieve Program, donations to charities and the implementation of community outreach initiatives, and through the production and airing of public service announcements.

sike
08-31-2004, 11:08 PM
very nice find, V.