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Chiwas
07-05-2005, 11:56 AM
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Chiwas
07-06-2005, 12:34 PM
Smiles fade as protest turns sour
Stephanie Todd
BBC Scotland news website

A Carnival for Full Enjoyment was what demonstrators said they wanted to hold in Edinburgh on Monday.

However a short march, which started with plenty of colour, samba drums and whistles in the west end of the city, soon turned into a day-long game of cat and mouse.

Many protesters focused on fun but those seeking to cause disorder laid down the gauntlet to police officers who were determined to keep control.

It was to be a day of general protest against the establishment, with a particular focus on capitalism and "wage slavery history".

As I went out to cover the event I was reminded of the famous quip from Marlon Brando in the movie The Wild One. When asked what he was rebelling against, he replied: "Whaddya got?".

Following the two sides around the capital's streets on Monday were excitable members of the media.

Much of Edinburgh itself was already prepared, with many shops having shut for the day, their doors and windows boarded over.


There may have been some relief among press photographers who had been deployed by anxious editors hours earlier

Those retailers who did open on the main shopping thoroughfare of Princes Street had private security men in place to keep a close watch on entrances.

The demonstrators were supposed to rally at midday in the west of the city but while there were small groups none seemed more substantial than about 100 who started to congregate near Edinburgh's financial district.

There may have been some relief among press photographers who had been deployed by anxious editors hours earlier.

A colourful and noisy march was managed by police who used officers on foot along with police horses to slowly move the swelling band down Shandwick Place and into a small backstreet at Canning Street Lane.

A lot of these protesters were dressed in clown outfits and carried musical instruments and whistles.

Protesters
Many of the protesters were from other European countries

Many of those taking part were from other European countries and were in their late teens.

With high buildings on either side, police officers formed human walls at each end, trapping the protesters and stopping their movement.

The officers moved slowly, with arms down but deliberately fixing their gaze, on the lookout for any potential trouble.

One anarchist managed to climb onto the roof of an annex building and egged on the crowd.

He threatened to urinate over the police but instead resorted to dropping his trousers and showing his behind.

Among the hundreds being held, despite the odd skirmish, were a small group of masked individuals dressed in black who had clearly come to show a more aggressive face of anti-G8 protest.

Impromptu march

Slogans spray painted by them on building walls ranged from "make your voice heard" to "smash kapital".

The group was eventually allowed to disperse one by one through the wall of police, but only after submitting to bag searches and agreeing to have their photographs taken.

As they moved on, officers were soon called to respond in numbers to a protest in the middle of Princes Street.

Trouble flared when a separate impromptu march of hundreds spilled onto the main road and what had been a peaceful demonstration turned into an ugly confrontation near the Scott Monument.

Protesters blowing whistles stood on top of bus stops while others flying black flags jeered at police.

A secondary wave of demonstrators trying to join those on Princes Street were corralled by officers in riot gear into Princes Street gardens where missiles were thrown and arrests were made.

As various small stand-offs continued, protesters looked visibly more organised. Police later confirmed that the anarchists were found to be carrying maps, two-way radios and mobile phones.

Shops which had promised to remain open quickly shut their doors as trouble flared, in many cases locking startled shoppers and tourists inside.

A family of American visitors to Scotland's capital said they had no idea what was going on after arriving from the airport at the height of the trouble.

One said: "We came out for a look round but we'll be staying inside our hotel until it's safe to come out. We've only just arrived and don't even know what's going on."

Monday's "carnival" was the third event in as many days in the capital, coming after the Make Poverty History march on Saturday and a smaller Stop the War demonstration on Sunday.

One Edinburgh resident told BBC Scotland's news website that she was angry protesters had stopped local people going about their daily business in the city.

She said: "I marched with my family on Saturday for Make Poverty History, but what is today supposed to be about? I don't know anything about these demonstrators, or what they are hoping to achieve.

"It seems like a complete waste of time as far as I'm concerned and to be honest they are nothing more than a pest.

"If this is G8-related, the sooner it is all over the better. Scenes like these are the last thing ordinary people want to have to face in their home town."

Chiwas
07-06-2005, 12:40 PM
Thousands flock to poverty march
Marchers in Princes Street

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41258000/jpg/_41258735_marchprincesafp203220.jpg

The mass of protesters makes its way along Princes Street
Thousands of protesters have taken part in a Make Poverty History march in Edinburgh, as musicians performed in Live 8 concerts around the globe.

Organisers, police and city council officials put the estimate for the number of people involved at approximately 225,000.

The marchers heard speeches from political and religious leaders as well as celebrities who back the cause.

They called for the G8 leaders meeting at Gleneagles next week to take action.

Saturday's march was one of a number of events planned in the run-up to Wednesday's G8 summit and was the largest single protest ever held in Scotland.

It coincided with the series of Live 8 concerts in cities around the world, including London.

About 200,000 people were in Hyde Park to see performers including U2, Pink Floyd, Madonna, REM and Coldplay.

The concerts spanned nearly 24 hours, with the first starting in Tokyo at 0600 BST on Saturday.

Organised by Live Aid founder Bob Geldof, they called for more aid for Africa, debt cancellation and fairer trade.

Organisers' reaction

Referring to the Edinburgh turnout, a spokesman said: "Make Poverty History are absolutely delighted with this, to see so many people come to show that they really care."

Lothian and Borders Police said they arrested just one person at the event in connection with drug-related offences.

Assistant Chief Constable Ian Dickinson, who led the policing operation, said: "I want to pay tribute to the crowd of 225,000 who came and cooperated with the police to make this a successful and memorable occasion.

"I also want to pay tribute to the organisers of the march who have achieved their objectives through meticulous planning and cooperation."

Edinburgh City Council said the success of the march had exceeded their expectations. A spokesman described the crowd as "extremely good-natured".


Marchers began leaving a rally in The Meadows at intervals from noon.

The head of the procession re-entered The Meadows shortly after 1320 BST. At 1500 BST, marchers - who had been asked to wear white - stopped and held hands in a minute's silence to make a human version of the white band which has been adopted as the Make Poverty History campaign's emblem.

A small group of about 50 protesters walked ahead of the main procession, many in business suits and ties, apparently mocking multinational companies.

There was applause as they passed a Starbucks and they bowed down towards McDonald's as one of their number chanted: "Two, four, six, eight, we really must accumulate."

Pope's message

A strong police presence was in place as the procession turned left off Princes Street and up along Lothian Road towards the city's financial district.

Ranks of officers, some on horseback and seven police vans greeted the demonstrators as they were directed away about 100 yards from the Standard Life and Clydesdale Bank headquarters.

There were some minor scuffles near The Mound, where the Bank of Scotland has its corporate headquarters. This was spotted from a helicopter and police acted quickly to curb the protesters involved.

Earlier, a message from Pope Benedict XVI was read out in which he said people from the world's richest countries should be prepared to accept the burden of debt reduction for poor countries.

Chancellor Gordon Brown, speaking at a Christian Aid and Church of Scotland rally following the march, said: "We are today seeing Britain at its best, united as one for a great cause. We have come a long way and have still a long way to go."

He met some protesters and assured them that they would not be disappointed by the outcome of the G8 talks.

Scotland's First Minister Jack McConnell watched the march as it passed onto Princes Street. He said: "This is fantastic, it is a great carnival atmosphere and it is a message of hope.

"We are in a beautiful city with a beautiful message and I hope it is being listened to."

Lord of the Rings star Billy Boyd addressed the rally and said: "With so many people here today, the leaders have to do something - thank you for coming."

Actor Pete Postlethwaite said: "We have had enough political spin, promises and downright lies."

Beryl Chatfield, from Worthing, Sussex, flew from Gatwick to take part and said: "I came to put pressure on the G8 to change things, for fair trade, aid and to drop the debt."

Sam Hawkins, 24, from London, said: "I think we're united around a common goal and that is eradicating poverty and working for a fairer world."


A number of protesters complained of being photographed by police as they made their way to Scotland.

Among them were three coach loads of people from Belfast who said they were held at Stranraer by police, photographed and had their bags searched.

Elsewhere, campaigners who took trains from Euston said they were not allowed to make the journey until officers had taken their pictures.

A group of about 60 demonstrators, some of them armed with sticks, were closed in following a stand-off with police.

Some 200 officers erected barriers and formed lines in an area near Edinburgh University. Half were in full riot gear including helmets and shields.

A police spokesperson said some of the black-clad protesters were wearing padded clothing and had been spotted as potential trouble makers. The situation was controlled without any arrests for disorder.

The incident occurred well away from where the Make Poverty History march was taking place.

'Carnival' concern

On Sunday, an Anti-War Coalition demonstration will take place in the city, followed by the Carnival for Full Enjoyment on Monday.

The latter is giving police concern because of reports that hard-core anarchists will use the event to cause trouble.

Assistant Chief Constable Ian Dickinson, of Lothian and Borders Police, said: "We have a long and successful tradition of overseeing marches, demonstrations and other high-profile events in a sensitive manner and enabling protest groups to make their point without having to resort to conflict.

"We welcome people who wish to take part but will not tolerate anti-social behaviour or criminal disorder."

Protest group, G8 Alternatives, is promising peaceful demonstrations.

Spokesman Dave Shields said: "When peaceful protesters get together to protest against poverty and war, then things will be extremely peaceful and there is going to be no cause for violence whatsoever."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4642053.stm

FishForLunch
07-06-2005, 02:17 PM
I think it is a matter of time before these dummos demand the release of Saddam.

Mavdog
07-06-2005, 02:53 PM
Originally posted by: FishForLunch
I think it is a matter of time before these dummos demand the release of Saddam.

huh? how you could see the story on the G8 meeting being in any way related to Hussein is anybody's guess i/expressions/anim_roller.gif

FishForLunch
07-07-2005, 08:58 AM
In case you did not read the article it was about protestors waving their peace signs and anti war slogans.

Chiwas
07-07-2005, 09:33 AM
The protest is against world poverty, mainly, against the immoral accumulation of wealth among few hands and few countries while millions (in fact, billions) live in poverty.

Since this protests initiated some years ago in Europe (later they spread through the entire world), I always have admired the Europeans for that: they live in countries where the incomes per capita are the highest of the world, and where the wealth is best distributed; they are the richest persons on earth. Nonetheless they protest, risking their lifes, for the persons who don't have and are suffering. Do you know why? because they know that something is more than enough wrong, and it seems they know pretty well what it is.

(The blasts in London contrasts significantly with their movement; we all know that they both are from different nature)



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dalmations202
07-07-2005, 10:19 AM
<u>I always have admired the Europeans for that</u>: they live in countries where the incomes per capita are the highest of the world, and where the wealth is best distributed; they are the richest persons on earth. Nonetheless they protest, risking their lifes, for the persons who don't have and are suffering. Do you know why? because they know that something is more than enough wrong, and it seems they know pretty well what it is.

Why do you admire the hypocrits?

They have the most, fain worry about the underpriviledged, but will never lower their own standard of living to equalize the capita throughout the world.
The United States gives more $$$ in aid than any other country in the world, but is seen as "bad" by other countries, including many European.
If the US uses it's military might to change countries run by dictators, who hoard the money/power, then the US is a war monger -- regardless of the fact that it improved the "standard of living" for 80% + of the population of that country. If they don't, and just send aid -- see Somalia and Ethiopia, it just make dictators more powerful, and the suffering greater for the needy.

Change has to start at the top, or "things will never change".

On another note: Yes, I think that we should all do more to help the needy. More action, less "b!@#$" about it.

Mavdog
07-07-2005, 10:28 AM
Originally posted by: FishForLunch
In case you did not read the article it was about protestors waving their peace signs and anti war slogans.

in case you missed it, the article is not about "protestors waving their peace signs and anti-war slogans" and Saddam Hussein or Iraq aren't even mentioned. in fact there's (what?) only two mentions of any anti-war bent in the two articles total.

care to comment on what the article is about, the G8 meeting? in case you missed it, the G8 meetings have nothing to do with Iraq or Hussein.

FishForLunch
07-07-2005, 01:57 PM
So what the F is the picture of protestors with peace signs doing in the article. The losers who hold peace signs are Anti-war types and human shield assholes.

Why dont you get some glasses

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41258000/jpg/_41258735_marchprincesafp203220.jpg

Mavdog
07-07-2005, 02:41 PM
Originally posted by: FishForLunch
So what the F is the picture of protestors with peace signs doing in the article. The losers who hold peace signs are Anti-war types and human shield assholes.

Why dont you get some glasses

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41258000/jpg/_41258735_marchprincesafp203220.jpg

oh, the picture under the headline "thousands flock to poverty march"?

those peace signs are generic. peace is critical if poverty is to be defeated, war is an obstacle to any campaign against poverty.

very telling that in your mind anybody wanting peace in the world are "losers" and "human shield assholes". you remind me of the general in Dr. Strangelove....

FishForLunch
07-07-2005, 10:27 PM
You remind me of Noam Chomsky.