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StrikerV
07-24-2005, 03:56 PM
CHECK IT! SHAWN KEMP AND ERIC DAMPIER = BEST DUO SINCE CHAMBERLAIN

haha!

http://www.realgm.com/src_wiretap_archives/36764/20050724/kemp_vows_to_play_in_nba_again/

Lebanese_Fan
07-24-2005, 04:11 PM
They say he slimmed down (no more double chin). He was athletic, and the key word is WAS. If the Mavs are desperate enough, we can get him for the vet min.

fin4life
07-24-2005, 04:22 PM
I was worried that this thread would be mavericks related... luckily that out of shape has-been is not playing for us.

snoop
07-24-2005, 06:07 PM
give me kemp for the vet min. if hes back to 280 then 35 is not too old for a big man

alby
07-24-2005, 08:10 PM
280 is nasty lol

during his reign man days, i estimate he was around 230-240

Drbio
07-24-2005, 09:11 PM
Just say no to washed up no talent spares like Kemp.

#1MavsFan
07-24-2005, 11:16 PM
He seems pretty determined, I'd be willing to give him a shot. low risk high reward.

Nash13
07-25-2005, 02:03 AM
I think Shawn Kemp is Alby's dad. j/k

alby
07-25-2005, 02:27 AM
i dont get it

Nash13
07-25-2005, 02:29 AM
I thought it was a well known fact that he has 7+ kids by six different women.

alby
07-25-2005, 02:39 AM
dang, wheres my money then =]

Arne
07-25-2005, 11:08 AM
Originally posted by: alby
280 is nasty lol

during his reign man days, i estimate he was around 230-240

He was 260 during his Seattle days.

MavKikiNYC
07-25-2005, 11:13 AM
Originally posted by: Arne

Originally posted by: alby
280 is nasty lol

during his reign man days, i estimate he was around 230-240

He was 260 during his Seattle days.


Nah, he was 230-40s.

He's useless now at 280, 260 or whatever. No skills, no smarts. No thank you.

Arne
07-25-2005, 11:32 AM
Let's quote the article in the Seattle Times...:

HOUSTON — Shawn Kemp is standing next to his car, a Dodge Magnum RT with Oregon plates and 24-inch chrome rims and windows tinted black. He's strapping 25-pound weights on each ankle. Dressed head-to-toe in swooshes — Jordan socks, Nike Shox and red and white shorts — he shoves two American flags into the ground at George Bush Park.

His hill awaits. But why the flags?

"This is the American dream,'' Kemp says.

The hill stretches about a quarter mile in each direction, its summit equidistant between two green gates. The sun beams from the diamonds in each earlobe. Kemp takes a slug of water.

It's time to head back toward the top.


Readying for a return


Kemp's house is a five-minute drive from the park, tucked into a swanky neighborhood called Lakeside Parkway. There's a pool with a Jacuzzi and a waterfall in the backyard, four cars — the Dodge, a Hummer H2 with spinning rims, an Escalade EXT 300 and a Chrysler REMI — in the driveway, a bright red Vespa scooter in the garage and a pit bull puppy running around the house.




It's clear that, at 35, Kemp never has to work again. So why is he heading toward his "sweatbox" and closing the garage door? Why is he balancing on a yellow ball, lifting a medicine ball overhead and grimacing through hundreds of crunches? Why is he jumping rope, lifting weights and trimming the fat?

"I'm going to play again,'' Kemp says, speaking in depth publicly for the first time since he retired two years ago after a 14-year NBA career. "And if I'm going to play again, there's only one way to do it. The right way. On my own.''

Kemp says this isn't about the money. It's about the way his legacy has been defined. You look at him and see a troublemaker, a baby factory, a talent unfulfilled. More than once, Kemp says he doesn't care what anybody thinks. And yet he cares so much, he's willing to leave the Cribs-style house and lavish lifestyle for all the things that dragged him to the bottom.

Here's how he got there. Here's Shawn Kemp in 2003, too fat to look at himself in the mirror. Here's Shawn Kemp, quitting with two years remaining on his contract.

"Don't even call me about no basketball,'' Kemp told his agent, Tony Dutt.

The fall was hard. When he left the Sonics in 1997, he jumped like his shoes were made of Flubber. But by the spring of 2001, Kemp checked himself into a rehabilitation facility for cocaine abuse. His weight had ballooned to 317 pounds from the 260 he carried in Seattle. Kemp returned from the NBA lockout in 1998 so heavy his coaches in Cleveland worried about a heart attack. Kemp says he'd still be an All-Star if the lockout never happened.

He's finally talking now, rain clouds hovering above the Reign Man. He looks trim, close to the player Seattle remembers. Gone are the rolls of fat and double chin that defined him later, replaced by definitions in muscle fast returning. He's talking fast, animated, gesturing with arms spread wide to make his points. There's a reason, an excuse, for everything that happened.

And then, at the end of every explanation, Kemp places the blame squarely on his shoulders. It's tough to gauge where he wants that blame to go — on the events he says conspired against him or on himself.

"You see, I never blamed anybody for any of this,'' Kemp says. "I put my own self in the dirt.''


Changing a legacy


Why come back? Because this isn't how Shawn Kemp wants to be remembered.

Kemp views his descent differently than you might. Kemp sees the growth — with family, with financial security, with, most important, himself. You see a guy who can't stay out of trouble, and all the images his name conjures.

Maybe you read the 1998 Sports Illustrated cover story that said Kemp fathered at least seven children by six different women. Probably knew, too, that he gained a small child's worth of weight, went to rehab, sued Reebok and was arrested in Shoreline this past April when small amounts of marijuana and cocaine were found in his car.

You might recall he clashed with George Karl in his final season with the Sonics, showing up late to practices, missing team flights and fretting over contract issues. You know how he's remembered — as a player who could have been one of the best ever. But isn't.

"The perception is what they read about,'' Kemp says. "And what you read about isn't going to be very positive. I'm not trying to come back and change the perception of what people think about me. They can think what they want to, man.

"People obviously don't really know me.''

Not that he wants you to. Kemp hates attention, hates the camera, hates this daylong interview in and around his Houston home. Kemp says he's not comfortable in the spotlight, that he's not Charles Barkley. He says this more than once. Because of that, Kemp believes there's a disconnect between the person that he is and the person that you know.

Kemp says he doesn't have to prove himself to you. Certainly not through the media. But then he switches gears again, talking about how this comeback could boost him into the Hall of Fame and rewrite the ending to his basketball career. He doesn't have to prove anything to anybody, he says, but his words suggest he's trying anyway, trying to change the definition of Shawn Kemp.

That's what this comeback is about. Proving to the NBA he's changed. Proving to himself that he belongs among the elite. Proving that the world's perception of Shawn Kemp is different than reality.

"It's tough as hell to be good,'' he says. "By me stepping out of my contract a couple years ago, if that don't prove heart, I don't know what else does. I didn't have to do anything. But I don't want to disrespect the game of basketball.''

He has the money, the family, the house. So why doesn't Kemp just go away?


A family man


Why come back? Because Kemp's life is finally in order. He left the game of basketball, left the hill entirely and found something more important — himself.

He's married now, to Marvena Kemp, a woman he calls the family's backbone. Kemp first spotted her on a basketball court and introduced himself at a 7-Eleven near the Seattle Center later that day. They were friends for years before they dated and nearly a decade before they married.

As always, Kemp's reputation precedes him.

"It took me awhile [to get her to say yes],'' Kemp says. "She was ready for me to change my lifestyle around.''

Their three sons — Jamir,10, Jamar, 8, and Jaman, 4 — live year-round with Marvena and Shawn in their two homes, one in Houston and one in Washington, in Maple Valley. Kemp won't discuss his other children or even how many he has, other than to say he has never missed a child-support payment, and he won't let his wife be interviewed.

It's a strange sight, seeing Shawn Kemp playing the role of father. He's telling Jamir to call his mother and scolding Jamar for throwing a quarter down the street, taking them to movies and making sure they go to bed on time.

While working out in the garage, Kemp says he used to go to bars, to clubs, to parties. He knows the concept of him as a family man sounds out of place, but he insists his family is his club now.

"It's made a big difference,'' Kemp says. "My lifestyle is probably not quite what people would expect it to be. Even then, it wasn't.''

Together, he and Marvena are staples at basketball camps and youth clinics in the Seattle area. That's another side of Kemp most people don't know. Children in Seattle used to call him "Santa Kemp.''

Marvena runs the Marvin Thomas Memorial Foundation in honor of her late father, and Kemp and his inner circle run his own foundation.

"People don't have a concept of how much Shawn does in the community,'' says Willie Austin, who has run the Austin Foundation for the last 12 years, teaching youth about life and sports. "Shawn is the kind of person that, if you call him up and say, 'Shawn, we need you here,' Shawn will show up.''

Kemp remembers growing up in rough neighborhoods in Elkhart, Ind., when players came to clinics, pulling up in a Mercedes Benz for 20 minutes while the local television cameras rolled, then leaving. Kemp hated that. They weren't real. He wants to be.

"I'm not going to sit here and tell anybody I haven't had difficulties in my life, haven't made any bad decisions,'' Kemp says. "But to sit back and consider myself a bad person or not doing something positive, it's so untrue. I'm all for doing positive. I've worked in the community. My wife, she's spending her life basically giving back to the community. That's something that we take pretty seriously, man.

"I've done did enough bad things. If they can pick up one thing from me, I'll be all right with that.''

Combine all of it. Building a family. Securing his financial future. Stepping away from basketball. Working in the community. Understanding the importance of a family. That's why Kemp believes he's different now. Will that change anybody's mind?

"It's like I've always told him,'' Dutt says. "Until he gets it, it doesn't matter how many other people get it.''


A setback in Shoreline


Why come back? Because the early-morning hours of April 4 only add to skepticism.

Two days before Kemp was arrested in Shoreline, he's standing in front of a group of Garfield students, telling them to stay out of trouble. At the time, he's also helping coach his son's club team in SeaTac.

King County case number 05-093767 details the rest. Kemp was sitting with his longtime friend, Gavin Jones, in Kemp's Chevrolet Zodiac — a "big, super-semi-looking truck,'' he says.

Scott Dery, a King County sheriff's deputy, noticed the truck behind a Brown Bear Car Wash on Aurora. Kemp says they were coming from a nearby lake and stopped to clean out the car. He says there were cars on either side of his. He's speaking with regret, but also says police picked his car out of a crowded parking lot, a notion that differs with the police report.

Kemp says he knew there was marijuana in the car, but not cocaine. Had he known the contents of a bag in his front seat — more than 60 grams of marijuana, 1.2 grams of cocaine, a stun gun, a 9-millimeter handgun, pepper spray and Piña Colada tobacco wraps, among other items — Kemp says he wouldn't have allowed a search. He also says he wasn't smoking any pot, although the police report differs, saying, "Kemp indicated that they had smoked some earlier.''

Jones took responsibility for the drugs, but prosecutors charged both with attempted possession of more than 40 grams of marijuana and attempted possession of cocaine. Both pled guilty to gross misdemeanors, Kemp for attempted possession of marijuana only. He served five days of house arrest and returned to Houston. His most poignant memory during that time? The kids he spoke to two days before the arrest.

"I felt like I cheated the kids,'' he says. "That was a tough deal for me. That situation there probably made me get more focused on my life than I have been in 10 years or so. As bad as I hated it, I'll probably be thankful for it 10 years from now.''

The morning after he trudged home from jail, he gathered his children in an upstairs bedroom.

He told them he grew up around trouble. He told them he has learned from this situation, learned to trust himself and not necessarily trust his friends. He told them he has never been in trouble in 35 years. He told them it will be another 35 before it happens again.

Kemp's inner circle — Dutt, the agent; Scott Boatman, the lawyer; Brian Zaplac and Mike Wertheim, his business partners; and a handful of friends and family — say loyalty is his greatest strength and his greatest weakness. None of that inner circle left when Kemp fell out of the NBA. Dutt says their relationship is more father-son than agent-client.

"You can't be everything to everybody, and I'm not sure Shawn ever learned that,'' says Bernie Bickerstaff, the man who drafted Kemp. "That might be to his detriment. There was no pretense about Shawn. None whatsoever. When he was loyal, he was the most loyal guy ever. He has reason to be [mistrustful]. He had to learn not to trust people.''

Kemp agrees with his inner circle in that respect. He says he's not a big drinker, never has been. He won't talk about his drug use when asked about rehab, and claims there was never a major problem there, either. His problems, Kemp says, came from managing [or mismanaging] his life.

"This man has paid a dear price for the mistakes he's made,'' Dutt says. "There were huge, huge consequences. Millions of dollars in consequences. To live your life under a microscope like that — sometimes he used the wrong methods to get away.''

Looking back, Kemp calls his arrest the "calling card'' for the comeback. He was already working out, considering his options, but the arrest "put everything in overdrive.''

"I took it like this, man,'' Kemp says. "I was glad that happened because it really made me focus more.''

Problem is, the timing couldn't have been worse. Here's Dutt, talking to NBA general managers and coaches, telling them Kemp has changed his life. And there's Kemp, hands cuffed, giving NBA teams and skeptics another there-goes-Shawn-Kemp story for their water coolers.

Two months later, there's a copy of Justice Magazine on Kemp's living-room table. Jamar points at the banner headline — "Stars behind bars" — and wonders if his father made it in the issue.

Kemp clenches his teeth at the suggestion and patiently reiterates to his son that it won't happen again. But the arrest also serves a higher purpose on Kemp's path to a life lived better than before. It's not just about Kemp anymore. It's about doing right by his family, by his inner circle and by his legacy. Like the way things were at the top of the hill.

"The last couple of years Shawn has wanted to focus just on himself and his family,'' says Boatman, his attorney. "Making sure he was in the right place. That's what's so upsetting about his situation in Seattle — it's a setback for him on that path.''


Still loving Seattle


Why come back? Because of what it felt like in 1996.

Never mind that Sonics fans booed 19-year-old Kemp "something terrible'' on draft day in 1989.

"That scared me a little bit, man,'' Kemp says. "I was pretty confident that I was going to be able to turn some of them into cheers. I didn't know how fast.''

Seattle was the setting for the beginning of the legacy Kemp wants now. The decline happened so quickly, it's easy to forget that Kemp once held this city in the palm of his oversized hand.

Bickerstaff, then the Sonics' coach, could see the talent, the way Kemp jumped three or four times before other players could jump once, the explosive dunks, even maturity the Sonics didn't expect at first. They bring in Brad Sellers to mentor Kemp. By the end of the first month, Bickerstaff wonders why Kemp isn't doing the mentoring.

Kemp takes to running up a hill past Broadway on the side of I-5. His reputation goes national against Golden State in the 1992 playoffs, and he establishes himself as a possible Hall of Famer in the 1996 NBA Finals against the Chicago Bulls.

The Finals featured Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman, Gary Payton and Detlef Schrempf. And Kemp, who just might have outplayed them all.

"He was the best player on the court,'' Karl says. "No one can say he wasn't.''

"I sit back today, and I look at TV,'' Kemp says, "and I see how they talk about Karl Malone, I see how they talk about Charles Barkley. And I know the look in those guys' eyes when they used to walk out on the court to guard me. To see the fear in those guys' eyes because they knew what they had to deal with.''

Kemp sounds wistful looking back at this period of his NBA career. He also expresses, for the first time, regret over leaving the Sonics and the circumstances that surrounded his departure.

During a midseason game in 1997, Kemp watched Jim McIlvaine block seven shots off the bench against the Washington Bullets. He says he turned to the coaching staff and implored them to sign the big man to a long-term deal.

"Now,'' Kemp says, "that don't mean go give the big man all the damn money we got. It's not his fault they opened up the vault and gave him all the money. I would have done the same thing. We're still friends, and I tell him that all the time.''

By then, Kemp's relationship with Karl and the Sonics is already starting to unravel. His dunks are replaced with chronic truancy. Peter Vecsey drops a column in the New York Post alleging Kemp's drinking problem, quoting inside sources. Kemp's people have his teammates sign an affidavit saying none of them said anything.

The Sonics ink Payton for $87.5 million and McIlvaine for $33.6 million in the summer of 1997. Dutt says the Sonics told him to accept the fact that Kemp's timing is poor, that he's never going to make the money he expects to.

"Everybody can't be trouble-free,'' Payton says recently. "He had a career. Nobody can take that away for him. You might say it could have went this way or that way, but it didn't.''

That summer, Kemp goes on ESPN and says he will never again put on a Sonics uniform. He was at the top of the hill, standing tall, thrusting his chest, king of his own universe and maybe everybody else's.

He's doing the same thing now in his Houston home, puffing his chest and boasting about his back-to-back destruction of Barkley and Rodman in the 1996 playoffs. Kemp says he doesn't regret leaving Seattle. Then later, he says that he and the Sonics both regret it. His eyes burn straight ahead. What's worse, in Kemp's mind, is that the Sonics didn't win a championship in the early 1990s when they were built to.

"We failed," Kemp says. "As players, we really failed."In the next breath, his disappointment fades. The smile returns. This is the way he wants you to remember him.

"You know what?'' Kemp says. "I got nothing but love for Seattle, man. Nothing but love.''


Just one more chance


Shawn Kemp is standing at the bottom of the hill again, lean and looking for a chance.

The first ending to his basketball career embarrasses him. He admits playing his last four years without his trademark vertical leap. He says he weighs 280 pounds now, says he hasn't jumped this high in five years and hasn't been this fit since his Sonics days. He notes that he has never been seriously injured, that he's only 35 years old and rested from two years off.

He's doing 500 crunches a day, jumping enough rope to make a boxer proud and working with a trainer, Roberto Carmenati, on his basketball skills. After a few workouts earlier this month, Carmenati says Kemp is at 85 to 90 percent of the player he was in 1996.As Kemp tries to sell his comeback, he knows the questions will still be there, swirling around it like a cloud. The difference, Kemp says, is he's at peace with the long odds, with the curious glances and jokes about his past. He jokes that he might come back with a different jersey number and a mask on his face. The better to fool people into forgetting about his mishaps.

Kemp even rescinds his earlier comments about playing for the Sonics.

"Never say never,'' he says. "I'm not ever going to say never anymore.''

Kemp is smiling now. The smile suggests happiness. The definition in his arms suggests he's on his way back. The cars and the kids and the waterfall suggest that he's content.

With life, maybe. But not with his legacy.

Kemp continues to swear this comeback has nothing to do with money. For proof, he offers to let teams pay him after the season's over, based entirely on performance. Or play in Europe, if necessary.

This comeback is about Kemp, about his family and his inner circle, about the way he wants to be remembered. Asked if he deserves to be in the Hall of Fame, Kemp points to his play against Malone and Barkley.

He says he's not asking to be recognized that way, then says "videotape don't lie. But obviously, I've had some off-the-court issues.''

He says the NBA "doesn't owe me jack.'' And then says, "I do deserve a chance."

"I know what it took back in 1989 to go from the situation I was in, no college experience, and to play the way I did and work for what I got,'' Kemp says. "Without a championship, I'd be like anybody else who didn't make it. There would be a little question mark left after. Woulda, coulda, shoulda.''

The question is which team, if any, will take a chance on Kemp. Mike Fratello, his first coach in Cleveland, says he won't "place it outside the realm of possibility.'' Dutt says five or six teams have already shown interest. Seattle isn't one of them. Their first question?

"How much does he weigh?''

Ultimately, the decision is out of Kemp's hands. He says he's going to diet on oatmeal three times a day for the next three months, continue working out, and then "something positive is going to happen. Somebody is going to come knocking. Somebody is going to hit the jackpot.''

"I just don't know,'' says Bickerstaff, now general manager and coach of the Charlotte Bobcats. "What he needs to do right now is straighten out his life. At some point, you have to get on with your life. Basketball has been great for him. It's been a great means to an end. Sometimes, you have to make that decision — where do I go from here?''

Thing is, Kemp believes his life is already straightened out. His family, his finances and his perspective are in order. His legacy is not.

He's at the bottom of the hill again, back where he started. Staring at the top.

"Is his story a sad story?'' Dutt asks, before answering with an emphatic no. "It's far from sad. He's happy and content and can live his life this way forever. A lot of people would probably say that it was sad. And yes, there are sad parts. But I'd tell him all along, I don't think he's written the ending of his book, of his life in basketball.''

Kemp is leaving the house, the toys and the lifestyle behind.

The hill awaits.


SHAWN KEMP'S TAKE:


| On former teammates |

"I was blessed to play alongside a lot of good guys in my career in Seattle. If I had to pick one player outside of Gary Payton to ever play with again, it would be Detlef Schrempf. I always looked up to Detlef, and I took a lot from him."

| On NBA and NFL executive Bob Whitsitt |

"Bob Whitsitt is my guy, man. I love him to death. They can say what they want about Bob, but there's one thing for sure, he knows talent. And he's going to get talent. It's up to the players to figure out how good they want to be."

| On the current state of the NBA |

"To be honest with you, the game they're playing out there right now, until they get toward the playoffs, it's really not that exciting."

| On the Sports Illustrated story |

"The baby joint? I'm not going to do any of my kids like that. That's a real negative thing. Right now, I'm a married man. My wife don't want to hear about that."

| On the media |

"I think every athlete out there should expect for them to build you up to tear your ass down. Because that's what's going to happen."

| On working with kids |

"I can teach as much as their schoolteacher. But if there's one or two things that I can show them or maybe just give them the confidence to do something later on in life, that's really more of what I'm about."

| On his playing style |

"I wasn't doing that stuff to be fancy. That stuff was done straight out of emotion."

| On his peak |

"To let people know, my peak was never with the Seattle SuperSonics. My peak came the year after I left Seattle with the Cleveland Cavaliers. That was the best year that I ever had playing basketball. I played with six or seven rookies, and we made the playoffs."

| On his comeback |

"If every basketball team in this world called tomorrow and said, 'We won't take you,' that would be fine with me. And I'll tell you what: I'll still get up and run that damn hill. I'll still do it. Because I'll never put that weight back on again."

MavKikiNYC
07-25-2005, 11:36 AM
They're wrong.

I watched him play, and I know what 260 looks like on a guy 6-10, and I know what 240 looks like.

Like I said, he was 230s-240

He MIGHT have been 260 by the time his drinking problem flared up and he got FedEx-ed to Cleveland, and in Cleveland he was easily 280, fairly earth-bound and fairly uselss. During the strike, he ballooned to well over 300.

But when he played against the Bulls in the championship, he was, again, 230s-240.

Arne
07-25-2005, 11:51 AM
Ok, they're wrong... let's quote another article:

Kemp's decline telling for NBA

MIZELL
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By HUBERT MIZELL

© St. Petersburg Times, published April 18, 2001


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College kids, even high school basketball phenoms, figuring they can be the next Kobe Bryant or Kevin Garnett, opt to kiss off campus life, their young heads bulging with short-range fantasies that glitter with exotic motor vehicles, enormous houses and voluminous bank accounts.

Two-thirds of early leapers become flops. Many never make an NBA roster. Others have short careers, forced by their mid 20s to seek real jobs despite being desperately shy of academic preparation.

Agents can be greedy, misleading and even stupid. With no justification, some tell teenagers, "You're a sure first-rounder. We'll get millions to sign. Check out Kobe and K.G. for what can happen. Do you want to live in a dorm and ride a bike when you can be driving a Mercedes and living in a mansion?"

If agents cared, they'd be honest, supplying real odds. Airing pros and cons. Sounding more parental, less ravenous. Even when bodily talents are ample, assuring a fat rookie contract, pitfalls can be enormous when jocks get too rich too fast while being unblessed by adequate maturity or sensible counsel.

Big-eyed teen athletes should know about Shawn Kemp, with whom a shortage of life preparation is now more obvious than ever at age 31, in his 12th NBA season. This despite an $11.7-million-a-year salary with three seasons remaining on a Portland Trail Blazers contract that promises another $58-million.

Kemp is in drug rehab. Done for this season. Done for good? Treatment he probably could have used years ago. For eight years, after being drafted at 19 by the Seattle SuperSonics, the 6-foot-10 talent was the darling of TV highlights, with extraordinary physical propensities. Leading his team to the NBA Finals in 1996, where only Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls could dam their flow.

Shawn fussed with Sonics coach George Karl. He missed practices. But as long as a petulant Kemp was arousing NBA arenas with alley-oop dunks, his escalating and disgusting off-court habits were kept in a closet.

Sports Illustrated did a deep, disturbing study of NBA millionaires who were fathering nauseating numbers of illegitimate children. Larry Bird was among them, but Kemp was the lousiest example, with his kid count up to seven.

Still, he played on.

Kemp became the poster guy for almost everything that is wrong with the NBA. Still, he moved to the Cleveland Cavaliers and kept making more money. Not becoming any classier or more personally savvy. Not behaving any better.

Now this ...

Kemp's abilities have eroded. Shawn can't fly like in his mid 20s. Once characterized as "Reign Man," his parade now drowns in acid rain. Portland made a three-way deal that brought Kemp from the Cavs, with the Blazers giving up Brian Grant to the Miami Heat. Shawn was miserable this season, averaging 6.5 points and 3.8 rebounds, his worst numbers since entering the league in 1989.

His weight plumped from 260 pounds to 317. He was lethargic. Blazers teammates saw Kemp laboring and worried that he might fall dead on the court. Finally, he admitted to drug dependency. Agreed to get treatment.

Back in Seattle, as long ago as the early '90s, some suspected Kemp was using dope, but nobody would put the hammer down as long as he played spectacular hoops. Why does Darryl Strawberry also come to mind?

In his teens, Kemp was a phenomenon. Hero of a different kind of Hoosiers. Elkhart Concord went undefeated, winning the Indiana high school championship in 1988. Colleges tried everything to recruit Shawn.

Kentucky was his favorite, but that chapter was brief. Kemp's grades were inadequate and went to Trinity Community College in Texas. A year later, the NBA was there with its gold.

"In the NBA," Kemp once said, "they don't teach you. It's not a time to be taught, it's a game to be played." But, from the outside, the Reign Man seemed to be making it in grand ways. Overcoming the missing links of his life.

Misleading, superficial appearances.

Kemp said, when the Blazers brought him from Cleveland, "I see it as a rebirth of my career." Hardly. Who knows, if Kemp had played four seasons at UK, going to class and growing up, if he would've been amply prepared for all the NBA entails. But how could his odds have not been enhanced?

Some jocks are so shy of principles and mores that behavior is nearly certain to go sour, no matter the attempts to counsel. Still, we should expect professional leagues to try even harder. To understand the sins, straining more efficiently for preventions and cures.

Shawn Kemp is 31, wealthy and a sad case.

__________________________________________________ ____________________________________________


And now another article that seems to prove that your Cleveland-theory was wrong:

A weighty issue

Out-of-shape Kemp still a big problem for Cleveland
Click here for more on this story
Posted: Wednesday December 01, 1999 07:05 PM



Shawn Kemp's weight was an issue the day he walked into Cleveland's training camp in October. Last week, it was still an issue. As the 76ers were en route to manhandling the Cavs -- without the services of Allen Iverson or Matt Geiger -- Cavs coach Randy Wittman was visibly irritated with Kemp, who was a complete non-factor in the game. The Cavs have openly stated they'd prefer Kemp to be at 260 pounds, but I was told by one Cleveland official that Kemp is up to 285. Publicly, Wittman is trying to put the best face on things. "It's not really an issue with us," Wittman said. "He's so talented and he plays so hard, he hasn't allowed it to become too much of an issue. Besides, it's early." Again, that was before their horrible performance against the Sixers.

DevinHarriswillstart
07-25-2005, 12:13 PM
It makes me sad that we're so bored that we're talking about the return of Shawn Kemp. "Yawn"

Arne
07-25-2005, 12:30 PM
But reading this Seattle Times-Article I must admit that he shows some self-reflexion, on the contrary to the last times he opened his mouth in the media... Once he even tried to explain that his weight issues have nothing to do with him working out less or eating more...

snoop
07-25-2005, 12:33 PM
kemp was 260 amare is 250 both at 6'10. 6'10 230 looks like KG not kemp

kg_veteran
07-25-2005, 03:53 PM
Originally posted by: MavKikiNYC
They're wrong.

I watched him play, and I know what 260 looks like on a guy 6-10, and I know what 240 looks like.

Like I said, he was 230s-240

He MIGHT have been 260 by the time his drinking problem flared up and he got FedEx-ed to Cleveland, and in Cleveland he was easily 280, fairly earth-bound and fairly uselss. During the strike, he ballooned to well over 300.

But when he played against the Bulls in the championship, he was, again, 230s-240.

I agree.

Drbio
07-26-2005, 01:53 PM
There is no way in hell that kemp is ever anything more than a no talent fatass spare from this point on.

alby
07-26-2005, 02:30 PM
He was 260 in cleveland, but not during his early days in seattle..

http://ctchoops.com/shawn_kemp_fleer_rc.jpg

snoop
08-11-2005, 09:46 PM
C:\Documents and Settings\user\Desktop\kemp 3.jpg

Kemp doing his daily workout

I know this is sort of a joke thread but I would not mind seeing kemp for the vet min. Hunter is gone, so is Deke, Swift, Brown etc. You can see kemp has lost weight and the vet min might be worth a what if.

snoop
08-11-2005, 09:46 PM
C:\Documents and Settings\user\Desktop\kemp 3.jpg

Kemp doing his daily workout

I know this is sort of a joke thread but I would not mind seeing kemp for the vet min. Hunter is gone, so is Deke, Swift, Brown etc. You can see kemp has lost weight and the vet min might be worth a what if.

kriD
11-24-2005, 04:42 PM
Kemp plans to check out chances to rejoin league

By Marc J. Spears
Denver Post Staff Writer

Auburn Hills, Mich. - Former NBA star Shawn Kemp's agent plans on calling a handful of teams - including the Nuggets - to gauge their interest.

Kemp's agent, Tony Dutt, said he believes Denver could be a good fit because his client had his best years under Nuggets coach George Karl in Seattle. With Nene out for the season with a right knee injury and Kenyon Martin suffering from tendinitis in his right knee, another frontcourt player could aid Denver. But to add a free agent, the Nuggets would have to waive a player.

"Shawn told me he has had no problems with Karl and he could play there," Dutt said.

Kemp played for the SuperSonics from 1989-97. The five-time all-star also played for Cleveland, Portland and Orlando before ending his career in 2003. He has a history of weight issues and off-the-court problems. The Nuggets worked him out two years ago, but Kemp was grossly overweight and didn't have a solid outing. Dutt says Kemp now weighs about 270 pounds.

"That was a real wake-up call that if you're going to try to return, really do it right," Dutt said of the workout with the Nuggets.

Karl said he is in favor of taking a look at Kemp.

"I like Shawn," Karl said. "He and Gary (Payton) made my career. Without them, I'd probably be coaching a high school basketball team somewhere."

Said Nuggets general manager Kiki Vandeweghe: "I wouldn't discount anyone. There is that connection (with Karl). If anyone can bring it out of him, it's George. But it's nothing we've pursued."
(...)

alby
11-24-2005, 04:47 PM
270 pounds is still "grossly overweight"

snoop
11-24-2005, 11:43 PM
270 pounds is still "grossly overweight"

not at 6'10
damp is 6'11 265
fortson is 6'8 260

4cwebb
11-25-2005, 08:59 AM
I'd like to see Kemp get another shot with some NBA team --- it would be hard to believe that no team in the NBA won't take a shot at him at some point during the season if/when injuries decimate their front line depth. I presume such a team would be a contender of some sort who would look to Kemp to be potentially a piece that can help such team advance one level than they expect with their current crop if he works out, and if he doesn't, they'll only be the vet minimum worse for it.

birdsanctuary
11-25-2005, 10:54 AM
Let's go down to Moe's Tavern and check on the availability of Vin Baker, while were at it it!

sike
11-25-2005, 10:57 AM
just remember Kemp for the great old days....not as the washed up spare he became!

kriD
03-23-2006, 06:45 AM
Shawn Kemp eyes comeback, says he's slimmer

Associated Press

HOUSTON -- Former Seattle SuperSonic and Orlando Magic player Shawn Kemp says he's ready to get back in the game after three years of retirement from the NBA.

Kemp, 36, retired voluntarily from the Magic in 2003, citing weight issues. During his last NBA season he weighed as much as 320 pounds, but he has slimmed down to 270 pounds through an intensive exercise regime, he said.

"I've sat out this whole season to get in tip top shape to make a comeback," Kemp said in an interview with Houston television station KRIV.

The athlete's Houston-based agent, Tony Dutt, said he felt the weight loss would definitely rekindle Kemp's career.

"I was basically relaying the information the GMs were giving me: 'Until he loses the weight, we don't care if he can score 30 points a game. When he loses the weight, give us a call,"' Dutt said. "So there are going to be some phones ringing."

The former All-Star faced troubles other than weight loss during his career, which began when he was drafted by Seattle in 1989. He took a leave of absence during the 2000-01 season to enter a substance abuse program and violated the league's anti-drug policy three times.

Most recently, a Seattle judge sentenced him in May 2005 to five days of electronic home monitoring, a year's probation and a $440 fine after he pleaded guilty to attempted possession of more than 40 grams of marijuana.

Kemp said those problems were behind him and he was ready to recharge his NBA career with an enthusiastic comeback.

"My love for the game is very, very high," Kemp said. "I've made a living off of this game. I'm not coming back to play basketball for any financial reasons."

"I'm not playing just to make someone's roster. I'm not just playing to make a comeback. My hopes and dreams are to be in the Hall of Fame one day."

dude1394
03-23-2006, 08:14 AM
Shawn Kemp eyes comeback, says he's slimmer

Associated Press

HOUSTON -- Former Seattle SuperSonic and Orlando Magic player Shawn Kemp says he's ready to get back in the game after three years of retirement from the NBA.

Kemp, 36, retired voluntarily from the Magic in 2003, citing weight issues. During his last NBA season he weighed as much as 320 pounds, but he has slimmed down to 270 pounds through an intensive exercise regime, he said.

"I've sat out this whole season to get in tip top shape to make a comeback," Kemp said in an interview with Houston television station KRIV.

The athlete's Houston-based agent, Tony Dutt, said he felt the weight loss would definitely rekindle Kemp's career.

"I was basically relaying the information the GMs were giving me: 'Until he loses the weight, we don't care if he can score 30 points a game. When he loses the weight, give us a call,"' Dutt said. "So there are going to be some phones ringing."

The former All-Star faced troubles other than weight loss during his career, which began when he was drafted by Seattle in 1989. He took a leave of absence during the 2000-01 season to enter a substance abuse program and violated the league's anti-drug policy three times.

Most recently, a Seattle judge sentenced him in May 2005 to five days of electronic home monitoring, a year's probation and a $440 fine after he pleaded guilty to attempted possession of more than 40 grams of marijuana.

Kemp said those problems were behind him and he was ready to recharge his NBA career with an enthusiastic comeback.

"My love for the game is very, very high," Kemp said. "I've made a living off of this game. I'm not coming back to play basketball for any financial reasons."

"I'm not playing just to make someone's roster. I'm not just playing to make a comeback. My hopes and dreams are to be in the Hall of Fame one day."

Skirts here he comes. All old players go to pasture there now it seems. The new lakers club that old players go to to try and grab that ring.

bobatundi
03-23-2006, 10:13 AM
I wouldn't mind seeing him take Killer's spot behind Dirk, provided he comes cheap.

kriD
04-03-2006, 02:54 AM
Bump.

sixeightmkw
04-03-2006, 08:56 AM
people really have no sense of weight for people that are over 6 foot 6 inches. Kemp at 230 would be so freakin skinny it is not even funny. He was always 260. When I get home tonight, I will go and pull out my basketball card collection and pull out all my Kemp cards, covering from his rookie season through his up times in the league.

Tokey41
04-03-2006, 12:16 PM
I think we could use all the help we could get at this particular time... I mean he could really suprise us all as being a decent sub. I see no risk whatsoever for the mavs, hes way slimmer than that out of shape has been we all knew him as... so the question is what would he bring to the table? Well... size... cheap size! Thats always a plus.

sixeightmkw
04-03-2006, 12:17 PM
How many threads are there on Shawn Kemp?

u2sarajevo
04-03-2006, 12:32 PM
How many threads are there on Shawn Kemp?If we use the variable 'z' for the number of Shawn Kemp threads that exist.... then there are z too many.

TheBlueVan
04-03-2006, 01:22 PM
here's an interesting perspective...if he came back 70% of what he was in seattle, id say he's better than diop and would be worth a shot. i think that he would have a pretty good attitude also, coming back up from the bottom the way he has

MavsX
04-03-2006, 05:26 PM
You guys gotta check out what this guy said about Shawn Kemp, i laughed my A$$ off.

4. Shawn Kemp (108 letters)

Shawn Kemp hasn't lived up to his early promise, nor his fat contract.
Shawn Kemp is without a doubt the most overpaid player in NBA history. It's bad enough half of his money goes to his 3,421 illegitimate children or the impact of chemical dependency. I guess the Blazers think it's OK to shell out $12.7 million a year for six points a game.


http://espn.go.com/page2/s/list/readers/overpaidnba.html

kriD
06-04-2006, 07:04 AM
Kemp eager to return to game

By Marc J. Spears
Denver Post NBA beat reporter

Word of a slimmer Shawn Kemp recently seemed like stories of the Loch Ness monster or the Tooth Fairy. But late Friday night at a downtown Denver hotel, I confirmed the stories were true: The once 340-pound Kemp now looks like the all-star he was years ago.

After a two-season NBA hiatus full of drama, during which he was too overweight to play, the 36-year-old is about 70 pounds lighter and focused on ending his hoop career the right way, possibly with the Nuggets.

"What made it not fun was carrying around two bodies," Kemp said. "You can play at a high weight. You often feel like you can do things mentally, but physically you can't do it. That's what was going on for me. The instincts and all that were there, but I couldn't get the job done. Athleticism, conditioning, that is not a problem now."

Kemp was a six-time all-star, a three-time All-NBA third-team selection, a member of Dream Team II and was arguably the best player - yes, better than Michael Jordan - in the 1996 NBA Finals. But this weekend, "The Reign Man" was starting from scratch at the Nuggets' free-agent training camp that ends Monday.

"It's humbling, but it's fun," Kemp said.

How did this former NBA great go from one of the league's most popular players to free-agent camp?

The New York Post reported Kemp had a drinking problem while playing for Seattle in the mid-1990s.

During the lockout in 1998, Kemp reportedly went from 260 pounds to nearly 320 pounds. His scoring average dipped to 6.8 points his last season with Orlando three years ago.

In spring of 2001, Kemp checked into a rehabilitation clinic for cocaine abuse.

In April 2005 he was arrested in the Seattle area for having small amounts of marijuana and cocaine in his car.

Kemp knows his past will affect his NBA future and blames only himself.

"I'm a player with a history," he said. "Most teams, regardless to what the sport is, it scares them. ... It scares them simply because they don't want to wake up in the morning and read something, look and hear something. And that is what the situation is now.

"The only thing I can say to teams is I've been playing basketball all my life, man, and the time I took off, I learned more in those two years than the previous 10."

Nuggets coach George Karl, who coached Kemp in Seattle, sees a difference.

"Shawn always had a good heart," Karl said. "He just now seems a little more clearer, little more matured and more together."

Dallas has interest in Kemp and his agent, Tony Dutt, said three other teams do, too. But Denver could be the best fit.

The Nuggets have three free-agent big men in Nene, Francisco Elson and Reggie Evans and are exploring a trade for forward Kenyon Martin, who was suspended in the playoffs for conduct detrimental to the team. And Denver badly needs a veteran leader.

"I know which (teams) need big men and which ones doesn't," Kemp said. "The teams I work out for this summer will definitely need big men. Denver's one of them."

Kemp would have the makings of a solid support system in Denver.

Nuggets director of player personnel Mark Warkentien recruited Kemp to UNLV and worked with him in Seattle and Portland. Nuggets assistant Tim Grgurich played a big role in developing Kemp's game in Seattle. Kemp's longtime attorney, Scott Boatman, lives in Denver, and assistant coach Scott Brooks and guards Andre Miller and Earl Boykins are former teammates.

Kemp said if Karl wants him, there is a "strong possibility" he can play for Denver. Karl said he could better evaluate Kemp at the end of the camp.

"George - and I wouldn't say that about very many coaches - but as far as just him, man, I can work for him," Kemp said.

From the short time I saw Kemp in Saturday morning's scrimmage, he was agile, played great defense, looked strong, rebounded well and ran smoothly. Karl said Kemp shot jumpers initially - to his chagrin - but moved into the post.

Financially there is little risk involved should the Nuggets sign Kemp. They would have to pay him $744,551 for a one-year deal, with the NBA paying the other $433,797 since he has played 10 years.

If Kemp is just 60 percent of what he was, you've got a quality backup who is more than worth the risk. And, best of all, the former No. 40 would have a positive ending for his book that is in the works, "From 40 to 340 and Back."

"To make this happen now would be the biggest accomplishment of my life," he said.

Simon2
06-04-2006, 09:36 AM
So... the question is... Who do think is better? Kemp or KVH? Personally, I think the Mavs already found the best backup for Dirk. Can play defense, shoot threes, a big guy and loves Dirk already. He's been blowing kisses at him lately. Hahaha

kriD
06-09-2006, 05:52 AM
Kemp's hopes a Mile High

Big man sees comeback in Denver

By Marc J. Spears
Denver Post Staff Writer

Dallas - Although the Western Conference champion Dallas Mavericks have shown interest in Shawn Kemp, the six-time all-star is optimistic he will end up returning to the NBA in a Nuggets uniform next season.

Kemp hasn't played since the 2002-03 season with Orlando in large part because of weight problems and off-court issues, but after losing about 70 pounds he hopes to return. The 14-year veteran worked out at the Nuggets' free-agent camp last weekend.

When asked about his recent meeting with George Karl, who coached him in Seattle, Kemp said Thursday he was optimistic about signing with Denver.

"Things are looking very promising," said Kemp, 36. "I got a chance to talk to (Karl) before I left, and things are looking good. I'll say that much. I'm hoping so. I think the opportunity will definitely be there.

"I think the situation definitely would be good for me, because I've worked with a lot of guys in the Denver Nuggets' organization. I think the chances are very good that I'm going to be a Denver Nugget next (season)."

Kemp was expected to work out with the Mavericks in the regular season but never did. Kemp said he will be in Dallas on Saturday for the NBA Finals, but is coming to cheer for former Seattle teammate Gary Payton of the Miami Heat and not to talk to the Mavericks.

"My main purpose really to go to Dallas is I want Gary Payton to see my face," Kemp said. "I want to say 'Hi' to him."

Kemp said he will talk with other teams, including Dallas, but not anytime soon.

"I'm going to continue to run and continue to work out in this hot heat and continue to get my body a little stronger," he said.

Kemp played for the 1996 U.S. Olympic team and for Seattle with Karl in the 1996 NBA Finals. During the lockout in 1998, Kemp reportedly went from 260 pounds to nearly 320 pounds.

The Nuggets can't sign free agents until July 12. They could land Kemp for $744,551 for a one-year deal, with the NBA paying the other $433,797 because he has played at least 10 years.

"I'm thinking this can happen," Kemp said. "We'll know a little bit more after the draft. But so far things are looking pretty good."

No Nuggets executive could be reached for comment. Nuggets guard Greg Buckner said he was impressed by Kemp's hard work to return to the NBA and would welcome him to the team. Buckner said Kemp could be a good mentor for the Nuggets' young players.

"He looks good. He has some more work in conditioning to get back," Buckner said.

MavKikiNYC
06-09-2006, 08:09 AM
Ooooh.....this rivals the Utah/Toronto deal.

EricaLubarsky
06-09-2006, 02:46 PM
I hope Kemp and Martin have a fun season together

bobatundi
06-09-2006, 03:30 PM
maybe Kemp thinks he'll weigh less up in the thin air of Denver.

Thespiralgoeson
06-09-2006, 07:24 PM
So... the question is... Who do think is better? Kemp or KVH? Personally, I think the Mavs already found the best backup for Dirk. Can play defense, shoot threes, a big guy and loves Dirk already. He's been blowing kisses at him lately. Hahaha

I can't stand Tim Thomas, but his skillset would certainly be useful for the Mavs.

However, if we can't re-sign KVH for cheap, I doubt we'll be able to sign Thomas.

At the moment, Thomas does seem to be a better option than KVH, however. Not that he's that he's a much better player, or even any better at all, but he's not nearly as injury prone as KVH.

MavKikiNYC
07-21-2006, 11:48 AM
NBA's Kemp nabbed on drug charge

11:44 AM CDT on Friday, July 21, 2006


From KHOU-TV Staff Reports
Former NBA player Shawn Kemp was arrested in Houston on Friday for possession of an illegal substance, according to officials.
http://www.dallasnews.com/s/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/M_IMAGE.10c861fbfcb.93.88.fa.d0.b755d2f.jpg AP
Shawn Kemp was arrested Friday for possession of an illegal substance, according to officials.

Kemp has been charged with a misdemeanor for possession of marijuana. Officials reported he had less than two ounces of the drug.
Kemp was taken to the Harris County jail and was released after posting $500 bond. He is scheduled to appear in court on July 28.
Kemp began his career in 1989 as a first round draft for the Seattle SuperSonics. He was later traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers, followed by the Portland Trail Blazers. He ended his career with the Orlando Magic.
Kemp’s career highlights include five straight All-Star appearances and being a member of the gold-medal winning Dream Team II at the 1994 World Championships of Basketball.
Kemp retired from the NBA in 2003 and now lives in Houston.

Drbio
07-22-2006, 10:41 PM
I can't say that I am surprised. I figured it was a matter of time with Kemp.




HOUSTON -- Shawn Kemp (http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/players/profile?statsId=176) was arrested and charged Friday with possession of marijuana, the latest drug-related trouble for the former NBA All-Star.
Kemp, 36, was arrested following a traffic stop for driving without a license plate shortly after midnight Friday. An officer with the Harris County Sheriff's Department pulled Kemp over and said he noticed the smell of burning marijuana coming from Kemp's vehicle.
The officer later found less than 2 ounces of the illegal drug in Kemp's possession. The six-time All-Star was released from the Harris County Jail after posting a $500 cash bond and faces a July 28 court appearance.
Kemp checked into a rehabilitation clinic for cocaine use in 2001. In April 2005, he was arrested for possessing small amounts of cocaine and marijuana in his truck.
After 14 seasons with the Seattle SuperSonics (http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/clubhouse?team=sea), Cleveland Cavaliers (http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/clubhouse?team=cle), Portland Trail Blazers (http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/clubhouse?team=por) and Orlando Magic (http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/clubhouse?team=orl), Kemp retired from the league in 2003 and now lives in Houston.

kriD
07-24-2006, 09:44 AM
Kemp says he has not used drugs since 2004

By Greg Bishop
Seattle Times staff reporter

Shawn Kemp says he would take a drug test.

Shawn Kemp arrived at Green Lake Park on Sunday afternoon, smiling, shaking hands, hugging half the crowd gathered at the Battle of the Lake basketball tournament. This is the same man police arrested Friday morning in Houston for misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

In his first public comments since the arrest, Kemp told The Seattle Times there was marijuana in his truck on Friday, but he claimed that he has not used drugs since April 2004. Kemp also said he would take a drug test anytime and that he still believes he can return to the NBA.

The former Sonic knows how this sounds, like a broken record of excuses, another round of drug denials.

"I don't think it's going to hurt me on playing, but from the fan's standpoint, it definitely hurts me," Kemp said. "Because people are tired of hearing about this stuff. I'm tired of hearing about it, man. In all honesty, this one here probably affected me more than the last one did because I know what I've done since."

The "last one" he's referring to is another drug-related arrest last April in Shoreline, in which Kemp claimed the drugs in his car belonged to a friend. This time, near his home in Houston shortly after midnight Friday, Kemp was alone in his truck.

This is Kemp's version of events: He had just dropped off his lawyer, Scott Boatman, and was en route to a late-night gym. Harris County police pulled him over because his truck didn't have a license plate, and Kemp said that was because he was trading the truck in the next morning.

One report after the arrest said the deputy smelled burning marijuana when he pulled Kemp over. Kemp denies this, claims he hasn't smoked marijuana — or used any other drug — in more than two years. Kemp said police found four grams of marijuana in the back of the truck. He claims the drugs were old and claims he did not know they were there.

Kemp said police did not handcuff him, and he did not enter a jail cell. They took him to the station, he signed some papers and, when he left 45 minutes later, there was a TV crew waiting outside.

"As far as the fans, hell, I understand," Kemp said. "It's tough to recuperate after two of those. I was a fan before I was a player. I've seen other guys mess up, and I've been hard on them. It's a big embarrassment. It's the history of it, man."

The difference between this arrest and the previous, Kemp said, is that he's willing to take a drug test. The question is what team, if any, would be willing to take that chance.

"If teams want me, they can come in and test me," Kemp said. "If they don't, if that scares them, then that's going to be a tough one to live with. But I'm going to have to live with it.

"What it boils down to, man, is I'm a guy with some history. And if one of these teams does take a chance on me, if something goes wrong, they're going to let me go at the drop of a dime. And I know that."

Kemp said he will play basketball regardless next season, either with one of two NBA teams he said he's talking to or in Europe. Kemp wouldn't say which teams he is talking to, but he said both teams were playoff-caliber and that he talked to both after the arrest.

Kemp looked even slimmer at Green Lake than he did when he told The Times last summer of his intention to return to the NBA. The 6-foot-10 forward said he weighs 257 pounds.

"I don't mind earning my way," Kemp said. "I done ran and jogged and jumped rope and done so many drills this summer that getting on the court is easy. It's the other stuff now that I've got to deal with. The basketball stuff is going to be pretty easy."

His next scheduled court appearance is Friday, and Kemp did not discuss how he is going to plead. Asked if he would be in the NBA next season, he was more direct, while understanding it's possible no one will believe his explanation.

"It's a big chance that it can happen," Kemp said. "I just know how much I put into it, man. I've been able to change everything around. That's why this is a big embarrassment to me. I still hope something is going to happen."

sike
07-24-2006, 12:04 PM
Shawn Kemp?

Drbio
07-24-2006, 12:45 PM
He should legally change his name to Shawn Hemp and get it over with.

kriD
09-19-2006, 05:56 AM
No-show Kemp blows chance with Bulls

By K.C. Johnson
Tribune staff reporter

Shawn Kemp's planned workout at the Berto Center never materialized Monday, and it's unlikely the six-time NBA All-Star will receive another invitation from the Bulls.

Kemp experienced travel problems late Sunday night but still arrived in Chicago early Monday morning. Instead of working out with the Bulls, he traveled to his hometown of Elkhart, Ind., to visit an ailing relative.

Kemp, 36, who retired in 2003 after 14 seasons because of weight issues, also missed a planned workout with Dallas earlier this year.

The former dynamic dunker, known as "The Reign Man" in his prime with Seattle, has been trying to interest NBA teams since shedding about 60 pounds in 2005.

The Bulls, who considered Kemp an extreme long shot, have one roster spot to fill before training camp begins Oct. 3. Kemp and coach Scott Skiles have a longstanding relationship, dating to their formative basketball years in Indiana and throughout various meetings during their NBA careers.

Luke Schenscher, who averaged 1.8 points and 1.5 rebounds in 20 games with the Bulls last season, remains the leading candidate to fill the vacant spot.

kriD
09-19-2006, 05:59 AM
Is "missed a planned workout" an euphemism for "sucked really bad"? :cool:

MavsX
09-20-2006, 10:45 AM
He was 260 during his Seattle days.

what a fatty

Flacolaco
09-20-2006, 11:46 AM
Word of a slimmer Shawn Kemp recently seemed like stories of the Loch Ness monster or the Tooth Fairy.

I think they got the Fairy part right....

lol "missed a planned workout"