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EricaLubarsky
08-09-2005, 10:40 PM
10. Keyon Dooling, Orlando Magic (three years, $10 million; 12.9 pts, 4.5 ast, 10.04 PER)
9. Raja Bell, Phoenix Suns (five years, $24 million; 17.3 pts, 4.5 reb, 12.14 PER)
8. Samuel Dalembert, Philadelphia 76ers (six years, $58 million; 13.2 pts, 12.1 reb, 14.37 PER)
7. Cuttino Mobley, Los Angeles Clippers (five years, $42 million; 19.0 pts, 3.8 ast, 14.98 PER)\
6. Mark Madsen, Minnesota Timberwolves (five years, terms undisclosed; 5.9 pts, 8.5 reb, 6.76 PER)
5. Willie Green, 76ers (six years, $20 million; 16.4 pts, 36.6 FG%, 9.54 PER)
4. Kyle Korver, 76ers (six years, $27 million; 14.1 pts, 5.7 reb, 12.84 PER)
3. Brian Scalabrine, Boston Celtics (five years, $15 million, 11.6 pts, 8.4 reb, 11.01 PER)
2. Joe Johnson, Atlanta Hawks (five years, $70 million, 17.3 pts, 5.2 reb, 15.18 PER)
1. Jerome James, New York Knicks (five years, $28 million, 11.8 pts, 7.2 reb, 9.83 PER)

changed just enough so I didnt have to give credit to Hollinger of ESPN insider

poohrichardson
08-09-2005, 11:44 PM
Why is the Madsen signing a "worst of" candidate? The guy has balls of steel, works harder than any other player on the team, and is a complete class act. He only makes teams better. They're not signing him for his offensive production.

And besides.. the terms are undisclosed. You're telling me it was a bad signing if they got him for the league minimum? Brutal.

EricaLubarsky
08-09-2005, 11:51 PM
Hollinger says Madsen is a spare and has issues with his 5 year deal. In his opinion a hustle player like that shouldnt be signed for more than a year or two at a time. He's also coming off a surgery, and averaged 2.1points, 3.1rebounds last season

Anyway, my top 10 is a lot different. There is no way that Keyon is below 3 or 4.

poohrichardson
08-10-2005, 12:05 AM
Oh, right. I thought this was YOUR list. My bad.

Evilmav2
08-10-2005, 12:21 AM
That sure is a horrible list, and this Summer may still have some potential stinkers, as flawed players like Eddie Curry, Steven Hunter, Derek Anderson, Damon Jones, and Darius Songaila may all soon sign multi-year deals that are similarly horrible...

MavsFanFinley
08-10-2005, 12:36 AM
I posted the article in the Nets/Philly trade thread that Willie Green was not signed to that contract. He was injured in a pick up game before signing and was to have knee surgery today.

FreshJive
08-10-2005, 12:51 AM
What did he say about Dalembert and Korver? I don't think those contracts are way out of bounds. Those guys are still young, and centers are expensive. I'd take Dalembert over Damp. I also don't think Raja is so horrible, but I'm a Raja fan.

dirno2000
08-10-2005, 12:58 AM
Here's the full article:

-----------------------------------------------------

We've seen it two summers in a row now: Too much money chasing too few good players.

The giddy free-agent market of 2004 wasn't supposed to repeat itself in 2005, but if anything, it got worse. With several teams hoarding cash for a free-agent market that didn't contain a single superstar, the conditions were ripe for panic-stricken general managers to grossly overpay second-tier performers. They didn't disappoint us.

Out of all the millions committed to players with modest career accomplishments, it was my job to find the 10 most abominable contracts of the 2005 offseason.

So, starting at No. 10, here are the worst of the worst. Next to each, I've listed the player's contract dollars, stats per 40 minutes for 2004-05, and Player Efficiency Rating (PER, my rating of a player's per-minute statistical production). The league average PER is 15, but nine of these 10 players were below that mark last season.

10. Keyon Dooling, Orlando Magic (three years, $10 million; 12.9 pts, 4.5 ast, 10.04 PER)
Sometimes I wonder whether general managers watch any games during the regular season. Yes, Dooling played very well in the playoffs, but didn't anyone look at his four regular seasons? Orlando wants somebody to play the point next so Steve Francis can move to the two, but Dooling is even less qualified to play point than Francis. His assist numbers are terrible (only 4.5 per 40 minutes last year) and he can't shoot. This would rank higher if there were more money involved, but Orlando at least avoided breaking the bank for Dooling. Which is good, because they still vastly overpaid.

9. Raja Bell, Phoenix Suns (five years, $24 million; 17.3 pts, 4.5 reb, 12.14 PER)
Bell is this year's Kevin Ollie -- a dependable role player in his late 20s who inexplicably got a multiyear deal because a GM took a shine to him. Bell isn't a bad player he's just not somebody you give $24 million to. Moreover, by the last year of the deal he'll be 33, and role players who aren't great outside shooters tend to sink like a stone once they hit 30.

8. Samuel Dalembert, Philadelphia 76ers (six years, $58 million; 13.2 pts, 12.1 reb, 14.37 PER)
Unlike some of the other guys on this list, Dalembert can really play. I just doubt he's worth $10 million a year, especially if he stays hell-bent on goaltending every third shot. He's not going to provide post scoring, so the Sixers get their money's worth only if Dalembert defends and rebounds like crazy. He's done it in spurts, but that's it.

7. Cuttino Mobley, Los Angeles Clippers (five years, $42 million; 19.0 pts, 3.8 ast, 14.98 PER)
I guess that extra $5 million to keep Bobby Simmons was too much of a stretch, huh? Only the Clippers would go years as the NBA's biggest tightwads and then, when they finally commit money to a free agent, end up overpaying. Mobley is an average player even now, and by the end of the deal he'll be 34 and making more than $9 million a year.

6. Mark Madsen, Minnesota Timberwolves (five years, terms undisclosed; 5.9 pts, 8.5 reb, 6.76 PER)
I don't care what the terms are. A five-year deal for Mark Madsen? C'mon. He's barely worth the minimum based on his recent performance. Madsen's inability to score is well known, but some may not realize he's also a terrible rebounder. Last year he pulled down only 8.5 rebounds per 40 minutes, well below the norm for an NBA frontcourt player. Coming from the same club that gave Wally Szczerbiak $66 million, Troy Hudson $35 million and Trenton Hassell $26 million, this is further proof that the Timberwolves are far too in love with their own free agents.

5. Willie Green, 76ers (six years, $20 million; 16.4 pts, 36.6 FG%, 9.54 PER)
Speaking of teams that overspend to keep their own free agents: This one would rank higher except the Sixers might back out of the deal now that Green hurt his knee in a pickup game. It's hard to put into words what an abominable decision this was. Green's numbers last season suggested he'd have trouble staying in the NBA for one year, let alone six, and the Sixers already seem to have met their quota of shooting guards in point guard bodies. Besides, better players can easily be had for the league minimum.

4. Kyle Korver, 76ers (six years, $27 million; 14.1 pts, 5.7 reb, 12.84 PER)
Yes, the Sixers again. My colleague Bill Simmons was killing Billy King the other day for all the ludicrous contracts he's signed as Sixers GM, but these three might take the cake. In Korver's case, he's a great shooter, but he's not much of a basketball player. Between his defensive shortcomings and his near total inability to convert a field goal, he's well below average for a starting small forward and would be playing 10 minutes off the bench for most teams. Unfortunately, King's other moves included trading Keith Van Horn for Glenn Robinson and letting Matt Harpring walk as a free agent, so the Sixers are stuck with Korver as their starter at the three.

3. Brian Scalabrine, Boston Celtics (five years, $15 million, 11.6 pts, 8.4 reb, 11.01 PER)
Here's what I don't get about Danny Ainge's "brain-typing" craze: Didn't Scalabrine have the same brain last year? And hasn't he shot 39.3 percent for his career with that brain? If his brain type allowed him to become a good player, shouldn't it have happened by now? Thus far, Scalabrine's most enduring contribution has been as the league's best Michael Rapaport look-alike.

2. Joe Johnson, Atlanta Hawks (five years, $70 million, 17.3 pts, 5.2 reb, 15.18 PER)
Assuming this deal happens, it was bad enough for the Hawks to offer to pay Johnson roughly double what he's worth by giving him $14 million a year. It was bad enough that Atlanta's "plan" involves Johnson playing the point full-time, even though he gets into the paint about as often as Shawn Kemp gets into a leotard. But the real kicker for me is that the Hawks are now willing to fork out two No. 1 picks to Phoenix for the right to overpay Johnson so badly. Johnson's numbers have been inflated by all the minutes he's played, but on a per-minute basis he's a pretty ordinary player.

1. Jerome James, New York Knicks (five years, $28 million, 11.8 pts, 7.2 reb, 9.83 PER)
Of all the bad deals over the summer, this one takes the cake. It's one thing to overpay for a player who can play a little, like Johnson or Mobley. But what if you commit your full midlevel exception to a guy who can't play at all? That's what the Knicks did with James, rewarding him for the five good games he played in the Sacramento series and pretending the previous 82 games never happened. Between the inconsistent effort and the constant swooning over his alleged potential, James has become the new Michael Olowokandi, except that he's a worse player and even more egregiously overpaid.

FreshJive
08-10-2005, 01:38 AM
Thanks Dirno. I can see his logic on Raja and Korver. I guess the contracts just don't look that big to me, and Philly really needs a shooter like Korver with players like AI, Dalembert, and Igoudala.

alby
08-10-2005, 01:41 AM
how do Dalembert and Igoudala make philly need a shooter?

FreshJive
08-10-2005, 01:56 AM
Igoudala is more of a take it to the rack guy, and Dalembert ain't dropping any threes.