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nashtymavsfan13
07-07-2006, 11:21 PM
Commissioner for a Day

Jack McCallum, SI.com

If I were the NBA commissioner for a day, I would ...

1. Put a muzzle on certain P.A. announcers: Yes, they should root for the home team, and yes, they should pep up the crowd from time to time. But this incessant roar from some of them is over the top. As Steve Nash stepped to the line during a Dallas Mavericks-Phoenix Suns playoff game, the Mavs' announcer said: "Steve Nash, one noisy shot." Too over the top.

2. Dress-code alterations: OK, keep the NBA dress code and even enforce it once in a while -- it provided some needed public relations for a league that was struggling in that area. But at the same time, pass out a manual informing people them that millions of young Americans actually dress the same way "urban" NBA players dress.

3. Return to the press some of the front-row (or at least lower-level) seating that has gone to season ticket-holders: Yeah, like that's going to happen. But I had to say it, right?

4. Curtail crazy introductions: Make it mandatory that a team had to have advanced beyond the first round of the playoffs in the preceding year to have a smoke-and-lights pregame opening lineup display. It was great back when legendary P.A. guy Ray Clay brought out Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls to a bells-and-whistles presentation, quite another when we waste several minutes of our lives greeting, say, the Atlanta Hawks in the same fashion.

5. Schedule NBDL-NBA doubleheaders: If the National Basketball Developmental League is such a good product, as the NBA insists it is, schedule a few NBDL-NBA doubleheaders during the season. One of my fondest memories is attending weeknight doubleheaders at the old Convention Hall in Philadelphia.

6. Police the anthem: If a national anthem looks like it's going over the two-minute mark, arena officials are allowed to cut off the singer's microphone. We all know how the song ends, right?

7. Mandate that a player be in clear possession of the basketball before he is allowed to call timeout: It drives me nuts when there's a mad scramble for the ball, and, suddenly, a ref comes roaring out of the pack to say somebody -- somehow -- called a timeout.

8. Fix retro night: OK, we get the retro nights. We love the retro jerseys. We love the fact that the old players are remembered. But how about making it mandatory that every team have at least one retro price night? Admission is 10 bucks. Hot dogs are $1.25, sodas are $1. Convince the corporate suits to give up their boxes for an evening -- when, say, the Hawks are in town -- and let the regular folks who follow the game actually see one live. If the NBA has to underwrite this promotion for certain teams, they should do it.

9. Return the Finals to the 2-2-1-1-1 format: Yes, it makes for more travel, and the NBA misses out on the opportunity to flack the product for a solid week in one city. But playing three straight games at home unquestionably gives an advantage to the lower-seeded team. To have the 2-2-1-1-1 format for the first three rounds of the playoffs then abandon it for the Finals doesn't make good basketball sense.

10. Establish a section for wives: During the playoffs, establish a section where the wives of the visiting teams can congregate together, rather than sprinkling them in the stands among raucous home spectators. It is unclear what happened one night in Phoenix when a couple of spectators and Cassandra Johnson, the wife of Dallas Mavericks coach Avery Johnson, became embroiled in a confrontation. But it's not the first time it happened, and the NBA should do something about it.

jthig32
07-07-2006, 11:40 PM
I'm not really sure why I'm even bothering with this, it's such a throwaway article. Bored I guess:


3. Return to the press some of the front-row (or at least lower-level) seating that has gone to season ticket-holders: Yeah, like that's going to happen. But I had to say it, right?

Dumb. Just dumb. Another media guy with entitlement. Take MORE seats away from fans to give to media for free? Please. I'd make them all sit in the press box. It drove me insane to see Randy Galloway sitting on press row, midcourt during the WCF's, knowing that he hadn't seen the inside of the AAC before that all year, even though it's free for him.


5. Schedule NBDL-NBA doubleheaders: If the National Basketball Developmental League is such a good product, as the NBA insists it is, schedule a few NBDL-NBA doubleheaders during the season. One of my fondest memories is attending weeknight doubleheaders at the old Convention Hall in Philadelphia.

This is actually a pretty good idea, except for time issues. Maybe you could do them on Saturdays or Sundays. I'd like to see some DLeague games, but the prices just aren't cheap enough to justify it.


9. Return the Finals to the 2-2-1-1-1 format: Yes, it makes for more travel, and the NBA misses out on the opportunity to flack the product for a solid week in one city. But playing three straight games at home unquestionably gives an advantage to the lower-seeded team. To have the 2-2-1-1-1 format for the first three rounds of the playoffs then abandon it for the Finals doesn't make good basketball sense.


While I agree that 2-2-1-1-1 makes more basketball sense, I completely disagree that 2-3-2 favors the lower seeded team. I think it favors the highers seeded team, and it's not even close, really. Am I crazy?

dude1394
07-07-2006, 11:51 PM
Actually I think it does give an advantage to the lower-seeded team in that they sort of "catch-up" to the hca.

It allows imo them to get some wins to put some pressure on the other team.

jthig32
07-08-2006, 12:18 AM
Actually I think it does give an advantage to the lower-seeded team in that they sort of "catch-up" to the hca.

It allows imo them to get some wins to put some pressure on the other team.

To me, it seems to put so much pressure on the lower seeded team, to have all three of their home games be in a row. It's tough to win three games in a row in a playoffs series, no matter where the games are.

Just think, Miami won games 3 and 4, and STILL had all the pressure on them to win game 5, or they were down needing to win two games in a row in Dallas.

In a 2-2-1-1-1, the lower seeded team can win their first two home games, and then not have an absolutely must win in game 5, because they can still come home for game 6.

dude1394
07-08-2006, 12:26 AM
To me, it seems to put so much pressure on the lower seeded team, to have all three of their home games be in a row. It's tough to win three games in a row in a playoffs series, no matter where the games are.

Just think, Miami won games 3 and 4, and STILL had all the pressure on them to win game 5, or they were down needing to win two games in a row in Dallas.

In a 2-2-1-1-1, the lower seeded team can win their first two home games, and then not have an absolutely must win in game 5, because they can still come home for game 6.

It just seems like it gets the visiting team on a longer road trip away from their home so the lower-seed has a chance to get some games they might not have.

As far as game 5, that's always pressure for everyone anyway.

nashtymavsfan13
07-08-2006, 01:23 AM
Here's a commissioner for a day article about baseball:

Commissioner for a Day

Tom Verducci, SI.com


The coolest part of being commissioner, after getting my signature imprinted on the major league baseballs, of course, is the all-empowering "best interests in baseball" clause. Give me one day as commissioner and I would wield it like John Daly with a fork at an all-you-can-eat Sizzler. I'd make Kennesaw Mountain Landis look like a molehill.

I'd make the Nationals decide on a color scheme. I'd have the Mets stop playing awful music so loud. I'd order the Pirates to get their press box out of commercial aviation air space and close enough so that people can actually see the game, the Phillies and the Tigers to rebuild their ballparks so people can sit closer to the field, and all players to stand and face reporters when being interviewed instead of sitting down and mumbling into the undershorts hanging in their locker. Why? Because I could. And the players' association can bring on all the grievances they like, all of which I will make open to the media -- on live TV, even.

But let's start with the really important stuff. Here are the issues that need changing right away -- the top of my to-do list as commissioner.

1. Penalize the wild-card winner: Something's wrong when you've got every player and manager saying, "I don't care if we win the division. We just want to get in the playoffs."

The Houston Astros did not play a single meaningful game in their division race last year. And they won the pennant. If you finish 11 games out (like Houston did), you need to be given some kind of penalty for postseason play. Baseball is possibly the only sport in the world that does not arrange its postseason tournament to give the better teams a real edge.

It makes no sense that five of the last eight teams to play in the World Series were not even good enough to win their division over the proving ground of six months. It makes no sense that second-place teams have a winning record (24-18) in postseason series.

The solution: You get one fewer home game in the Division Series and in the Championship Series. The wild card team gets one home game (Game 3) in the Division Series and two (Games 3 and 4) in the Championship Series. Too harsh? Too bad. Win your division.

2. Get rid of the running lane to first base: It serves no purpose, other than to put runners and umpires in impossible positions. You're asking the runner to veer out of a direct line to the base but somehow touch the base, too. On no other base path is a runner made to take a wayward path like that. Why is home to first any different? (I told you we would be tackling the really big stuff here.)

3. Cut interleague and intradivision games: I like both concepts, but like ice cream, you can only stomach so much of a good thing. Interleague play, which needs to be branded much better, needs its own stage. It should be limited to the two weeks leading up the All-Star Game. Twelve games in one exclusive window.

That's it. And 19 intradivision games are too many. They need to be trimmed to about 14 or 15. You say the schedule is too hard to work around those numbers? Deal with it. This is not the human genome project we're talking about here, fellas.

4. Raise the pitching mound two inches: It won't have a huge effect on dampening offense, but the slight increase in the downward plane might help keep pitchers healthier.

5. Start World Series games no later than 7:30 p.m. Eastern Time, with Saturday games starting at 6 p.m.: A whole generation of kids have grown up never having seen Mariano Rivera pitch in October; he usually does so around midnight.

6. Increase steroid testing: Adopt the WBC method: Two players from each team should be randomly tested after every game. Also, as in the Olympics, substances that turn up positive in tests will be announced along with the suspension.

7. Hold all appeals of suspensions within 24 hours: Ever heard of video conferencing? Please stop the practice of guys filing appeals just to enable them to drop them at a more convenient time.

8. Mandate that every club set aside 200 free tickets for every home date for youth groups: Owners, I'm sure you're smart enough to build the lost revenue into the prices of the box seats and luxury suites. But baseball needs to make a real effort to reach out to kids. Making them welcome at the ballpark can make them fans for life.

9. Demand that every team spend at least 80 percent of the league average payroll over any three-year period: It's the reverse luxury tax system. The 2006 Marlins are a travesty to baseball and a mockery of the revenue-sharing system. They are making no attempt to field a major-league-caliber team. You want to cut back on payroll one year? Fine, but you'd better spend that welfare money you're getting over the next two seasons.

10. Limit September call-ups: It's ridiculous that pennant-race games can be decided by large-revenue teams playing with as many as 40 available players after playing five months with 25. Lower-revenue clubs don't like paying so many extras or starting their service clocks, which also increases costs. The solution: Every night the manager must designate no more than five players who were not on the Aug. 31 roster as his active September additions. A team may want to give more than five players the experience of being called up to the bigs in September, but you must keep the playing field even every night by putting a universal limit on it.

fluid.forty.one
07-08-2006, 02:51 AM
"9. Return the Finals to the 2-2-1-1-1 format: Yes, it makes for more travel, and the NBA misses out on the opportunity to flack the product for a solid week in one city. But playing three straight games at home unquestionably gives an advantage to the lower-seeded team. To have the 2-2-1-1-1 format for the first three rounds of the playoffs then abandon it for the Finals doesn't make good basketball sense."

I've thought this all along, just didn't want to say anything because I didn't want to be called a homer.

dude1394
07-08-2006, 10:10 AM
"9. Return the Finals to the 2-2-1-1-1 format: Yes, it makes for more travel, and the NBA misses out on the opportunity to flack the product for a solid week in one city. But playing three straight games at home unquestionably gives an advantage to the lower-seeded team. To have the 2-2-1-1-1 format for the first three rounds of the playoffs then abandon it for the Finals doesn't make good basketball sense."

I've thought this all along, just didn't want to say anything because I didn't want to be called a homer.

The thing for me is that when you have east vs west coast teams there is no real way to determine who is the higher seed. I know that the higher seed has won more games but it's against different competition. Abandoning it for the finals makes perfect sense to me as you just can't objectively say which team should have the higher seed.

DevinHarriswillstart
07-08-2006, 12:24 PM
The problem with 2-2-1-1-1 is the momentum swing is basically given to the lower seeded team by the commishioner. Lower seeded teams need to create their own momentum. I truly believe the 1-1-1 was the death of us and basically was handing Miami the momentum that swung to game six. It Should be 1-1-1-2-2.....sounds irrational at first but why not? Regular season would have a lot more meaning. You should have to fight for that final's home court and we did and I felt no advantage whatsoever. Why should the lower seeded team be awarded 3 home games in a row? Makes no sense to me.