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dirt_dobber
09-25-2006, 02:22 PM
The New York Daily News reports that the Knicks are trying to negotiate a buyout of Maurice Taylor’s contract, which has one year and $9.8 million remaining.

Taylor was reportedly one of the players Larry Brown wanted to release last year, along with Nate Robinson, Jalen Rose and Jerome James.

As for Brown, he’ll be sitting across the table from NYK owner James Dolan later this week while David Stern presides over their hearing concerning Brown’s contract.

The New York Post says Brown is asking for $53.5 million (a grand total of $62.5 million including what Brown earned last season), or $12.5 million more than what he originally signed for. The extra cash is for “liquidated damages” and attorney fees.

Along with the money Brown made this past season, if he were to win the entire judgment, he would walk away with $2.7 million per game that he won with the Knicks.

http://community.foxsports.com/blogs/DimeMagazine

Five-ofan
09-25-2006, 03:21 PM
I have always hated that guy but thats effing ridiculous. THE most overrated Coach in history and some people still think he is an all time great and the best coach in the nba. Hilarious...

Flacolaco
09-25-2006, 03:45 PM
"more than he originally signed for"


??????

He probably figures that that organization is so F'ing screwed up they just might give it to him. Hey Larry, how about not coaching the U.S. team through a humiliating olympics, then not sucking it up real good with your next team if you want money you didnt even sign for ?

Five-ofan
09-25-2006, 04:06 PM
when you quit/get fired 1 year into a five year contract, you arent getting more than you signed for in any business. You are lucky if you get half of what you signed for.

MavKikiNYC
09-25-2006, 05:40 PM
I wish he could get that amount trebled for damages. Hard to say that he 'deserves' it, but Dolan and Thomas definitely DESERVE to be punished for the scam they're trying to pull here.

I don't love Brown, but hate Dolan, his lackey Thomas and their bumbling NYKs infinitely more.

Go, Larry!

Five-ofan
09-25-2006, 06:25 PM
I wish he could get that amount trebled for damages. Hard to say that he 'deserves' it, but Dolan and Thomas definitely DESERVE to be punished for the scam they're trying to pull here.

I don't love Brown, but hate Dolan, his lackey Thomas and their bumbling NYKs infinitely more.

Go, Larry!
what scam? If you mean trying to pass Isiah off as a competent basketball executive in any sense than i can understand that, if you mean getting rid of larry which was at least as much his fault as theirs, i disagree.

Male30Dan
09-25-2006, 09:11 PM
You know, I am not a huge Larry fan either, but like Kiki, hate everyone else so much more with the Knicks.

Bottom line is that he was given that contract and they fired him. If that happened with an NBA player he would still get paid so pay Larry. They were so so stupid for giving him that contract anyway knowing well in advance that he moves around so much. Just to slap some sense into Dolan he SHOULD have to pay extra... Screw him.

Five-ofan
09-25-2006, 09:16 PM
You know, I am not a huge Larry fan either, but like Kiki, hate everyone else so much more with the Knicks.

Bottom line is that he was given that contract and they fired him. If that happened with an NBA player he would still get paid so pay Larry. They were so so stupid for giving him that contract anyway knowing well in advance that he moves around so much. Just to slap some sense into Dolan he SHOULD have to pay extra... Screw him.
he quit as much as they fired him, If i was the Knicks lawyer i would most definitely argue that Brown didnt make a good faith attempt to win as many games as he should have...

MavsX
09-27-2006, 09:58 AM
i thought they fired his ass

Five-ofan
09-27-2006, 10:07 AM
i thought they fired his ass
they did, but he was clearly not giving it his all either...

Underdog
09-27-2006, 03:22 PM
If New York wants to waste money, I could use a bit...

nashtymavsfan13
09-27-2006, 06:55 PM
If New York wants to waste money, I could use a bit...

Lol :D

I find it mind boggling how Larry Brown could end up with 60 mil for basically nothing.

MavKikiNYC
10-31-2006, 09:03 AM
Larry, Knicks bury hatchet
$40M dispute ends with deal
BY FRANK ISOLA

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/727-stern_david.JPGhttp://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/473-brown_thomas.JPG

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER
Commish David Stern settles Knicks-Larry Brown dispute.

Larry Brown's short and strange odyssey as coach of the New York Knicks officially ended late last night when Brown and the organization agreed to a settlement over the $40 million left on his contract.

Terms of the settlement were not disclosed and officials from both sides refused to comment on the resolution. The announcement came on the eve of the NBA opener and less than 48 hours before the Knicks are to start their season in Memphis with Isiah Thomas as their new coach. It was also made public days before commissioner David Stern, the arbiter in the dispute, was expected to rule.

"At my request, the New York Knicks and Larry Brown have agreed to a compromise resolution of the dispute between them," Stern said is a statement released by the league office. "Neither the club nor Larry have any future obligation to each other and have assured me, in response to my direction and request, that there will be no further public discussion of the matter. In addition, I have assured the parties that this resolution will have no precedential value in any future disputes before me."

"The press release speaks for itself," said Joe Glass, Brown's agent. "Whatever they said is fine."

Brown was fired in June following a 23-59 record and just 11 months after signing a record five-year, $50 million contract. Garden chairman James Dolan announced in June that he was withholding payment of the rest of Brown's contract, saying the club had just cause to terminate Brown because the Hall of Fame coach had violated some of its terms.

Brown had a clause in his contract that designated Stern to serve as the arbitrator in case of any disputes between him and the team. Brown also was seeking an additional $12 million in legal fees and damages. Before the arbitration hearing began, legal experts were predicting that Brown would receive at least $30 million.

It had been the Knicks' contention that Brown violated the terms of his contract by trying to consummate trades without Thomas' approval, criticizing players through the media and failing to return Thomas' phone calls.

Last month, during the first of two days of testimony at the league's Fifth Ave. offices, Dolan, Thomas, Brown and Garden sports president Steve Mills all were called to testify.

Two surprise witnesses were Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich and Knicks assistant coach Dave Hanners, both close allies of Brown. Hanners has worked for Brown in Philadelphia, Detroit and New York but was retained on Thomas' staff because he has four years remaining on his contract.

Popovich's presence suggested that the Knicks were trying to prove that Brown had attempted to make a trade with the Spurs without Thomas' knowledge. Both a current and a former Knicks public relations official also testified.

Since the first day of the hearing, Brown, who is living in Philadelphia, has refused to talk about the Knicks.

Also, Dolan was kept away from reporters and the Knicks' media paranoia reached all-time highs. Reporters were informed that Thomas would not be granting one-on-one interviews. Also, assistant coach Brendan Suhr was prevented from having any contact with the press.

Originally published on October 31, 2006

MavKikiNYC
10-31-2006, 09:15 AM
Thomas faces long goodbye
Fate of Knicks coach rests with his players
BY FRANK ISOLA
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER Isiah Thomas
Can a backcourt with Stephon Marbury and Steve Francis work?
Larry Brown was one month into his short-lived run as savior of the Knicks when Isiah Thomas came to him with a plan.

"We should try to play a more up-tempo game," the boss told Brown, according to a source, "like the Phoenix Suns."

Even if Thomas merely was trying to make a harmless suggestion, the meeting was the beginning of the end for the Brown-Thomas relationship, not to mention the 2005-06 Knicks. Incensed because he felt that Thomas already had broken his noninterference promise, Brown responded with a proposal of his own:

"Why don't you (bleeping) coach the team."

In spite of Brown's contentious tone, he clearly was onto something. Within six months, the Hall of Fame coach was out of a job and Garden chairman James Dolan was telling Thomas to grab a whistle and head to the bench. Who knows, Dolan may have even used a profanity or two.

"I didn't think that I would end up coaching the Knicks," Thomas says.

And last night, Brown severed ties with the Knicks in a compromise deal announced by the NBA. More than ever, the Knicks are Isiah Thomas' team ... for better or worse. Dolan has given him a vague ultimatum about showing improvement or Thomas' first year as Knicks coach will be his last. Already, it looks like an uphill battle.

The Knicks aren't much different from the team that finished with the NBA's second-worst record last season.
Jared Jeffries, Thomas' biggest offseason pickup, is expected to be sidelined six weeks with a fractured right wrist. And if the Knicks end up in the lottery again, the Chicago Bulls will receive their first-round pick for a second straight year.

The word around the league is Chicago should start scouting the best amateur players in college and around the world.

"Um, that's OK," Thomas said yesterday of his critics. "They have their opinion. Our job is to come out and play and perform and not be that concerned with what other people are saying because it really doesn't have that much effect on how you're playing."

Asked if he is confident that the team will be better, Thomas replied: "I'm confident that we'll improve. Most definitely."

Thomas' fingerprints can be found on every move and it is now his responsibility to prove that last year's 23-59 record was the result of Brown's manic ways and not because of Thomas' expensive cut-and-paste roster.

It was inevitable, of course. From the moment Thomas arrived it was speculated that he would move from the front office to the bench.

Thomas always said that it would be impossible to juggle both jobs and now he has no other choice. He will make his Knicks' coaching debut tomorrow in Memphis against a Grizzlies team that will be without its leading scorer from last season, Pau Gasol (broken foot). But Gasol's absence is where the breaks end for Thomas. The Knicks play 11 of their first 18 games on the road, including home-and-away dates with San Antonio, Houston, Cleveland and Chicago.

Thomas already has tried to lower expectations, saying he is "trying to prepare this team for a worst-case scenario." He has mentioned Jeffries' injury and the schedule as factors.

"I'm not bracing you for a slow start," Thomas insists. "I'm just being realistic about what (Jeffries) brought to the table." (Translation: "Brace for a slow start.")

A worst-case scenario only would lead to speculation about Thomas' future and could infect the locker room. When players sense they are playing for a lame duck coach, things tend to fall apart. Look no further than last season's Knicks.

Thomas, though, is confident he has unanimous support, a luxury Brown never enjoyed. Not surprisingly, a majority of the team blamed Brown for a disastrous season during exit interviews in April. (You didn't think the players would blame themselves, did you?) The theme for the entire organization this season is "blame Brown" for everything, from the record to the price of hot dogs.

Thomas, a brilliant point guard and champion as a player, never has been out of the first round as an executive or head coach. He went 131-115 as coach of the Pacers. During the 2001 playoffs, the Nets needed overtime to eliminate Indiana in a winner-take-all Game 5 and eventually went on to win the Eastern Conference title. Thomas' tenure with the Pacers could have been different had Indiana prevailed against the Nets. Overall, his playoff record as a head coach is 5-10.

As for his top players, Quentin Richardson is the only starter ever to advance past the first round. Eddy Curry remains a seven-foot (cup-cake butt) enigma. Channing Frye has struggled to regain his form and a Stephon Marbury-Steve Francis backcourt is a concept that most coaches would not wish on their worst enemy.

And hanging over Thomas' head is Dolan's open-for-interpretation win-or-else mantra. In June, Dolan said that Thomas has to demonstrate progress or find another job. A 10-game improvement is entirely plausible, but is that really progress?

"What ownership decides at the end of the day, I have no control or say in that," says Thomas. "I can only control the things that I can control, and people will judge it at the end. Our ownership will judge it and say if they liked it or if they don't like it."

Dolan's unwillingness to give a playoffs-or-else directive suggests that Thomas could survive with 30-plus wins. Remember, Dolan picked Thomas over Brown and it's hard to imagine Thomas being fired if the Knicks manage 35 wins. Yes, the bar at Madison Square Garden has been set at an all-time low.

The one advantage Thomas has is that he has a boss he can work with: himself. As team president, Thomas never has demonstrated an ounce of patience with his coaches. The Knicks' previous two coaches, Lenny Wilkens and Brown, are both in the Hall of Fame and each has one NBA title on his resume. And yet, Wilkens lasted 81 games in New York while Brown coached just 79, missing three due to illness.

Thomas may not have to deal with a meddling GM, but he will go week to week hearing about his job security. There is already speculation that former Knick and ex-Denver GM Kiki Vandeweghe is waiting in the wings to replace Thomas in the front office (unless Mark Cuban acts pre-emptively and hires The Other Kiki).

Yesterday, however, Thomas defended his job as Knicks' president.

"We came into a tough situation and we said it would take some time," he said. "In 2½ years we've got a pretty good roster."

Now Thomas has to win with the players he acquired, which is something neither Wilkens nor Brown could do. Thomas, of course, likes his odds. A born fighter, Thomas is not about to run from the challenge.

READER WARNING: BULL$HIT ALERT!!!

"I've basically been in (this) position all my life," he said. "I wasn't supposed to get there. I wasn't even supposed to be alive on this day that I'm standing here. I was supposed to be dead at 18 in my (Chicago) neighborhood so every day has been kind of do or die.

"When I got to the NBA I wasn't supposed to be anything. I talked about winning championships and everybody laughed at me.

"I don't like being in this position, but I seem to always find myself in the position where you've got the tough job to do." (Shut up and don't let go of your ankles until you're told.)

Big Shot Rob
10-31-2006, 01:17 PM
Look--I am not a huge Brown fan either.

When he was in San Antonio--he claimed he was fired. The owner claimed he quit--so there is history for Larry Brown BS with owners.

But this is real basic stuff.

Brown had a contract.

Unless he breached it in some material manner (i.e., not just some small bs infraction--but material breach), then basic contract principles will govern unless there is a clause that prevails.

Thus--unless Dolan has some clause that says otherwise--he owes Brown the entire length of the contract (remember--unless LB was in material breach).

Dolan is like one of the richest guys on the planet--richer than Trump. He could settle with Brown for the entire length of the contract like he was given a $20 bill to a parking valet.

alby
10-31-2006, 01:40 PM
"he would walk away with $2.7 million per game that he won with the Knicks."

haha oh man

V2M
11-08-2006, 10:06 PM
From Yahoo Sports
-----------------------

Cablevision: Knicks to pay Brown $18.5 million to settle dispute
November 8, 2006

NEW YORK (AP) -- Larry Brown will get $18.5 million from the New York Knicks, less than half of what the Hall of Fame coach had left on his contract when he was fired.

The NBA team's owner, Cablevision Systems Corp., announced the terms of the dispute Wednesday. Brown had four years and more than $40 million remaining on his deal when the Knicks fired him in June after one season.

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The settlement was reached Oct. 30, but the Knicks were forbidden to release the amount that the team agreed to pay Brown. Cablevision, which owns the Knicks through its Madison Square Garden unit, disclosed the amount in its third-quarter report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The Knicks, in Denver to play the Nuggets, said they would not comment. Nuggets coach George Karl, a longtime friend of Brown's, also was hesitant to comment, saying he preferred to talk to Brown first.

"I would say the majority interpretation over the last 20 years has been that our contracts are guaranteed unless written differently," Karl said. "I'm too old. I'll do anything the coaches' association or the associates want me to do to support him. My only thing is the respect of our job. Our job is a very difficult job."

The Knicks fired Brown after the team went 23-59 in his only season in New York. Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan refused to pay the remainder of the deal, saying the team had cause to fire Brown for violating MSG policies.

Representatives for Brown and the Knicks testified before NBA commissioner David Stern for more than 15 hours over two days. A clause in Brown's contract made Stern the final arbiter in case of a dispute, but he got the sides to settle in a decision announced Oct. 30.

Stern prevented either side from discussing terms of the settlement.

Cablevision reported a narrower third-quarter loss Wednesday as the cable TV operator signed up more customers for premium services like high-speed Internet access and digital phone.

AP Sports Writer Arnie Stapleton in Denver contributed to this report.

Updated on Wednesday, Nov 8, 2006 9:25 pm EST

dude1394
11-08-2006, 10:07 PM
Nellie is very jealous.

MavKikiNYC
11-08-2006, 10:45 PM
If correct, then Popovich was correct that coaches should take some action.

Stern just particiapted in a rape.

V2M
11-11-2006, 08:57 AM
Who'll want Larry now?
By Adrian Wojnarowski, Yahoo! Sports
November 10, 2006

Adrian Wojnarowski
Yahoo! Sports
Eventually, Larry Brown will want back into the NBA and the issue surrounding his return is unmistakable: How much of his talent makes him worth the unprecedented doses of duplicity, double-crosses and diva that come with him?

As one league executive said, "More than ever, you know what you're getting with him."

What you're getting is a coach who promises to usurp your authority as general manager, who promises to change his mind every 10 minutes on the roster. Since the 2004 Athens Games, Brown has exposed himself as a headcase beyond the biggest in basketball, beyond any teenage knucklehead born of America's AAU circuit and sneaker culture.

He's Artest in Armani.

For an NBA executive to watch what happened with Team USA elders, Joe Dumars and Isiah Thomas on Brown's last three coaching turns, he has to know that Brown is too toxic to hinge his own survival to this coach's fleeting whims.

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Across the NBA, several executives polled were unanimous: Brown will work again, but it won't be with a stranger. What will spare him the indignity of needing to go back to college and getting one more program put on probation will be the welcoming arms of the Carolina family.

"I think Charlotte (is) the lead team, because of Michael (Jordan), because he's a former North Carolina guy and because the people there still have strong feelings for him," one Western Conference G.M. said.

Back to his Carolina home, back to the warm embrace of Dean Smith's extended family. This could be where a Hall of Fame coach needs to exact redemption on his beleaguered reputation. The New York Knicks bought out the final four years of his original $50 million for $18.5 million, documents revealed this week.

Somehow, it left Brown's old boys to cast him as a sympathetic figure, a martyr in the struggle for coaching contract rights. Yes, Larry is a genuine Cesar Chavez, fighting the good fight for the working man.

With him out of sight now, Brown has his last loyalists stumping for him, San Antonio's Gregg Popovich – whom Brown gave his big coaching break with the Spurs – and George Karl – a Tar Heel. Mostly, though, Brown has isolated himself. Popovich and Karl insist that the Knicks' failure to honor the entirety of his contract was suddenly the beginning of the end for the sanctity of the coach's contract.

Listen, there were no good guys in the Knicks-Brown fight (think Iran and Iraq in the old days) but Brown stopped trying in New York a year ago and everybody knows it. Even before his Knicks’ players did, Brown threw up his hands and quit. He was trying to prove a point that he had hated the personnel and hated Isiah Thomas and, well, he proved his point all the way to 23 victories.

Across the past three years, Brown has had some run of quitting on his teams, beginning in Athens where he immediately started distancing himself from his roster before Team USA played a game. He was bitching that he didn't have enough shooters, even though it was his recommendation that the U.S. bring UConn's Emeka Okafor over Milwaukee's Michael Redd. During the Olympics, Brown did everything but jump over to the Serbia-Montenegro sideline mid-Games.

For all the talk of the ugly NBA American in Olympic play, none had ever conducted themselves as selfishly as Brown. From commissioner David Stern to USA Basketball officials, no one left the Olympics thinking anything but what a slug Brown turned out to be for the red, white and blue.

From there, it was home to Detroit to defend his NBA title, something that Brown couldn't do in the spring of 2005 without pining publicly and privately for the presidency of the Cleveland Cavaliers. He would leave the most dignified general manager in basketball, Dumars, for one of the most Machiavellian in Isiah Thomas, a money grab to end all money grabs, bailing on a championship contender for Cablevision's New York coaching slush fund and a renegade roster of losers.

Just understand this: Brown won't go away. He won't retire in Philadelphia where he's living with his family now. For years, Brown has said he'll take a high school job, forever selling himself as some sort of purveyor of basketball purity. That's been one of the truly phony tenets of his whole act, because Brown wouldn't walk across the street without a bag of money sitting on the sidewalk.

So yes, now the Carolina family can still salvage his tattered image. Still, it's strange. Brown is the anti-Dean Smith in every way. Somehow still, Smith has stayed loyal to him. The legendary Tar Heels coach didn't deliver Brown what he ultimately wanted in 2000 – the UNC coaching job – but then again, even old Coach Smith couldn't have lived with Blue Heaven going on probation the way that Kansas and UCLA did under Brown's ethics-free watch.

Nevertheless, Charlotte part-owner Michael Jordan will be partial to his Carolina roots. He tried to hire Roy Williams with the Wizards. What's more, the Bobcats' personnel fit Brown's half-court, defensive-minded style, with Okafor and Scott May on the inside, a dead-eye scorer in Adam Morrison and a tough, Tar Heel guard in Raymond Felton on the perimeter.

The thing is, Bernie Bickerstaff has done a terrific job constructing and coaching this franchise, but no one expected him to be the long-term choice there. The Carolina family is running the Bobcats now, and the clan's black sheep is wandering again, searching for a home.

Larry Brown is going to coach again, even if fewer NBA arms than ever will be open to him. If it turns out to be Charlotte, you can hear the rest of the league letting out a deep sigh and muttering these words: Better them than us.

Adrian Wojnarowski is the national NBA columnist for Yahoo! Sports.

MavKikiNYC
11-11-2006, 01:36 PM
Lawyers rule deal for Larry a winner

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/185-brown_instructs.JPG
BY FRANK ISOLA
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

HOUSTON - Larry Brown's salary for one tumultuous season in New York: $10 million.

The value of his contract settlement with the Knicks: $18.5 million.

Gaining his freedom from James Dolan and keeping his good name: priceless.

At least that is the opinion of legal experts who believe that Brown negotiated a smart and lucrative settlement in order to sever ties with the Knicks.

"It is my strong belief that Larry Brown and his lawyers knew exactly what they were doing and that they were not afraid that the Knicks would win the case," said Dan Feinstein, an employment attorney from the Manhattan firm of Davis & Gilbert. "For all intents and purposes, this was a great deal for Larry. Removing the offset provision is significant. It probably foreshadows that Larry will be coaching again."

According to a person familiar with Brown's contract with the Knicks, the offset provision in the deal called for the Knicks to receive 60 cents on the dollar if Brown were hired by another team upon being terminated by the Knicks.

The same source maintains that even if NBA Commissioner David Stern had awarded Brown the $41 million his contract called for, Brown would have received those payments over four years. The present-day value of that $41 million is $31 million. Instead, Brown has already received a lump sum of $18.5 million. And with the offset provision eliminated, he is free to coach without the Knicks receiving compensation.

According to a source, Brown's lawyers questioned whether Dolan would continue to fight Brown in court until his contract ran out in four years. The source pointed to Dolan's expensive fight to keep the West Side Stadium from being built as an example.

After two days of testimony last month at Stern's midtown offices, the commissioner advised both parties to reach a settlement. A deal was agreed upon last week, and the settlement was revealed on Wednesday when Cablevision Systems Corp., which owns and operates Madison Square Garden, submitted its quarterly report to the Securities & Exchange Commission.

It has been widely speculated that the Knicks had a strong case against Brown because he received less than half of the $41 million he was owed.

"That would be erroneous to conclude that," said Feinstein, who had no involvement in the case. "It just means that getting rid of the offset has great value to Larry. That's what it means to me."