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OutletPass
06-03-2003, 11:57 AM
Lampe leaves lasting impression
By Chad Ford
NBA Insider
Send an Email to Chad Ford Tuesday, June 3
Updated: June 3
11:49 AM ET


Editor's note: ESPN NBA Insider Chad Ford got exclusive access to the pre-draft workouts of Dwyane Wade, Maciej Lampe and Chris Kaman on Monday. Here's his report from Hoops Gym.


CHICAGO -- How do three potential lottery picks prepare for the NBA Draft? Think lots of shooting, protein shakes, shuttle drills, suicide runs, weightlifting, some one-on-one with a foam dummy and a lot of instruction from Michael Jordan's personal trainer, Tim Grover.


Theron Smith and Dwyane Wade jostle each other in a dribbling drill at Hoops Gym.

9 a.m.: Marquette's Dwyane Wade hits the court to begin the first workouts of the day. He's joined by Ball State's Theron Smith, North Dakota's Jerome Beasley and Marquette's Robert Jackson.

After a light warm-up, trainer Grover pulls out a pair of 7-foot-5 foam dummies and asks Wade and Smith to start shooting over them. Wade and Smith follow each other, putting the ball on the floor, swinging around one dummy and shooting high-arcing shots over the next. After 15 minutes of shooting, Grover returns and runs them through the next drill.

This time, both players are told to stand in the free-throw circle. Each is given a ball and told to keep dribbling while trying to steal the basketball from the other player. The drill makes both players look a little bit like a dog chasing his tail. Wade manages to get a couple of pokes in on Smith's ball, but he isn't able to keep dribbling and poking at the same time.

Grover then runs the players through some shuttle drills. Both Wade and Smith have excellent lateral quickness. Soon Grover has them back to shooting. Both Wade and Smith are facing similar issues in the draft: They're too short to play their collegiate positions in the NBA, and there are doubts they can adapt to new positions. Wade is trying to prove to teams that at 6-foot-3, he can make the transition to the point, at least part-time. Smith, at 6-foot-7, is trying to convince teams he can play small forward.

The knock on both players is their perimeter game, so Grover makes them chuck up shot after shot after shot. Things look pretty good until they step out past the NBA 3-point line. Wade makes just 11 of his 25 long-range attempts. Smith is a bit better, hitting 13-of-25. After they're done shooting, Wade and Smith are asked to dunk the ball from a standing start, flat-footed, with their backs to the rim. It's cake for the 6-7 Smith. But it's the 6-3 Wade who grabs everyone's attention with a rim rattling dunk.

Grover claims both players are making major progress. "Both of these guys are unbelievable athletes," Grover says. "The trick is just to get them consistently shooting the ball. They usually shoot better than what you saw today, but obviously, they need more work."


Lampe

11 a.m.: 18-year-old Polish forward Maciej Lampe has been warming up for two hours on an adjacent court. He showed up at Hoops two hours early for his workout. He's been doing that for the past four days. "I didn't know a lot about the kid when he first came in," Grover said. "But I learned real quick. He took a 10-hour flight from Spain, drove over here straight from the airport and went through a two-a-day before he had even unpacked a bag. When you have that kind of desire, good things happen."

Lampe is actually bursting with desire. After suffering through a lonely season in Spain, where he received little in the way of coaching, Lampe is ready to roll. I ask him how he's enjoying his first trip to the U.S. "I got to see Hooters," he says with a big smile. "But it really wasn't as big of a deal as I thought it would be." Anything else? "Not really, I came here to work," Lampe said. "And to see Hooters," he says again with a smile. Lampe nervously fidgets with his shorts as he awaits his turn to work out. After four days of solo workouts, he's getting his first chance to work out with some Americans.

They just happen to be Elton Brand, Darius Miles, Corey Maggette and Quentin Richardson.

That's a pretty big jump from the ULEB league, in which Lampe used to play. "He's been unbelievable in workouts," says Greg Ryan, Hoops director of scouting. "But he still doesn't think he really belongs playing with the top guys. We think he does. Today we'll prove it to him."

Brand is the first to arrive. This is also his first week working out at Hoops. After a disappointing season with the Clippers, Brand said he felt like it was time to come in and make sure his body was in perfect shape to handle the rigors of next season. He smiles when he's told he'll be working out with Lampe: "The rookie!"

Brand and Lampe begin shooting, matching each other around the court. As Lampe gets more confidence, his superior touch from the perimeter allows him to pull away. "That kid can shoot man," Brand said. "How do you keep up with that?" Lampe and Brand also work with the foam dummies. Today Brand is in the post working on hooks shots over the 7-foot-5 obstacles. Lampe is working on his outside game.

At one point Lampe starts to get winded, and Grover approaches agent Keith Krieter with some advice.
"What's he eating for breakfast?" Grover asks. "Fruit Loops." "Not a good idea. He needs to take in about 30 percent more protein in the morning." Where does Grover get the 30 percent number? "I can do it just eyeballing him. He's got to start eating better. Most of these kids are the same way."

Ryan claims that when Bulls guard Trenton Hassell first arrived, his diet consisted of Kit Kat candy bars.
"I said, 'O.K., but what do you eat for meals,' " Ryan said. "He just says, 'I eat the Kit Kats for meals.' It doesn't get any worse than that."

Lampe looks ready to roll after a brief breather. He keeps working out relentlessly until Richardson and Miles arrive. Miles greets Lampe at mid-court and tells him to take it easy on Brand. Soon Lampe and Brand are in another shooting contest. Lampe finishes 15-of-25 from NBA 3-point range. Brand was a few steps below that. After the workout, Brand sings Lampe's praises. "That kid can play now."

Grover calls Lampe "special."

"His fundamentals for that size and age are off the charts," Grover said. "He's going to be a great player once he hits the weight room a bit and bulks up." Richardson claims Lampe will be a top-10 pick with one caveat. "Let's just hope you don't have to play for the Clippers," Q tells Lampe. "We have no money, no coach and no clue." Lampe laughs. One week in the U.S. and already he has figured out everything a young prospect needs to know -- where the Hooters are and how to avoid the Clippers.

2 p.m.: By the time Chris Kaman arrives, several other players are spreading the bad news. "Have you seen the 18-year-old kid from Poland," one asks. "He's 7-foot and his shot is fantastic." That's all Kaman needs to hear at the moment. He's coming off a lousy workout with the Clippers and doesn't want to know there's another 7-footer waiting to take his job.

Kaman looks remarkably like Lampe from a distance. They're about the same height, weight, body type and hair color. But Lampe is listed as a small forward and Kaman as a center. It doesn't take long to understand why. Kaman is nailing hook shots with his right hand and his left. He looks more comfortable on the low block. His footwork is outstanding. His perimeter game, however, needs some help. Kaman is money from 10 feet and in, but when he strays farther, the shot just won't fall. At one point he playfully punches out the 7-foot-5 dummy in disgust.

"I know you're a reporter, but can the shooting thing be off the record," Kaman asks. Um, no.

Kaman also doesn't appear to have the athletic ability Lampe does. However, that shouldn't stop him from making an impact in the league. His knowledge of how to play in the post exceeds Lampe's limited experience. Lampe will get by on size and athleticism. Kaman will be forced to use his head a little more -- and his body. Grover's goal is to make Lampe quicker. Kaman, on the other hand, is lifting every day trying to get stronger.

"If he's going to play center, then we've got to make sure he doesn't get pushed around," Grover says. "So we've really got him on the weights. He's got a nice frame, I think he'll be just fine."

signoftimes
06-03-2003, 12:43 PM
OP- I don't follow the draft as closely as you, but Kaman is projected to go higher than Lampe? Is Lampe's stock going to rise above Kamans? or is Kaman's performance dropping him below Lampe? or are both stocks moving in opposite directions (lampe moving up while Kaman dropping)?

Lampe is sounding more and more appealing with everything I read about him. Should be a good kid to watch for the next couple of years.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 12:55 PM
SIGN....it's only Lampe's first few workouts....but he's being looked at as another Dirk type, although not quite as good. So his stock is rising. The Euros have been well scouted, but not seen against NBA players....each will go up or down some, depending on the workouts.

Kaman, on the other hand, is falling just a bit...seems he's a bit stiff and slow. But Kaman is big and will still go fairly high. The knicks at #9 think he'll be available. Consensus opinion seems to think Lampe will go higher.

In my mind, the draft order will come down to trades. Someone is going to want to move up and someone is going to want to move down...then the players will fall in line. And, even then, it won't be a great predictor of future NBA success. I've just posted a history of the last 5 drafts that you may want to look at.

Some highlights:

Biggest Bust: Sagana Diop, 8th to Cleveland.
Biggest Bust: Chris Mihm, 7th to Chicago.
Biggest Bust: Trajan Langdon, 11th to Cleveland.
Biggest Bust: Robert Traylor, 6th to Dallas.

Biggest Steal: Carlos Boozer, 35th to Cleveland
Biggest Steal: Gilbert Arenas, 31st to Golden State
Biggest Steal: Michael Redd, 43rd to Milwaukee
Biggest Steal: Emanuel Ginobili, 57th to San Antonio
Biggest Steal: Rashard Lewis, 32nd to Seattle

signoftimes
06-03-2003, 01:07 PM
Just read your post on the past 5 drafts. good stuff.

As far as Lampe, was it you who proposed the trade to Chicago to get rose and their first round pick(lampe)? I remember seeing that post, but can't find it now. That trade is beginning to be more and more enticing. Even if Kaman falls down below Lampe and Lampe goes before 7th(bulls pick) Kaman sounds like he has a good enough post game to Help the Mavs. Again, I need to evaluate the draft with a lot more scrutiny(which should happen in the nect few days),but with the european invasion, the draft seems like a good place to get a big man with experience against other world players and the basics instilled from an early age.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 02:10 PM
Nope...SIGN...it wasn't me.

I've looked at the Knicks at #9. They're dying for a PG.

BUT Barbosa is really moving up...and they may just stick there and take him.

Just my idle speculation.

Ummmmm Ok
06-03-2003, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by: signoftimes
Just read your post on the past 5 drafts. good stuff.

As far as Lampe, was it you who proposed the trade to Chicago to get rose and their first round pick(lampe)? I remember seeing that post, but can't find it now. That trade is beginning to be more and more enticing. Even if Kaman falls down below Lampe and Lampe goes before 7th(bulls pick) Kaman sounds like he has a good enough post game to Help the Mavs. Again, I need to evaluate the draft with a lot more scrutiny(which should happen in the nect few days),but with the european invasion, the draft seems like a good place to get a big man with experience against other world players and the basics instilled from an early age.

Actually it was me that proposed Finley/29th pick for Rose/7th pick. I also proposed a Finley/Najera/1st round pick for Rose/Curry/1st round pick trade Idea. i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif

http://dallas-mavs.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=2&threadid=7061&STARTPAGE=4#bottom

signoftimes
06-03-2003, 02:56 PM
Ummmm Ok- I knew it was either you or OP. I just thought it was OP because of this thread.

That trade does sound good. Although, it would be difficult to convince anyone to trade finley for a Euro kid who has no NBA experience, Lampe or Kaman might be just what is needed for this team. If the KG deal to Chicago falls through, this would be a good alternative for them to explore.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 03:18 PM
I believe we'd have a problem dealing our #1 (at 29)...seems like you can't trade 2 consecutive #1's if I remember correctly...and our's last year went to Denver.

So I think it's just players/cash for a higher pick.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong about the NBA rules.

Edit: I just looked at another mock on hoopshype.com and they have us taking Beasley. Don't ya' just love all this crazy ass speculation !!!

Actually, I've taken Nellie's recent press conference remarks seriously....and I think that the Mavs are going to make a serious move or two. Just my hunch again.

seelenjaeger
06-03-2003, 04:25 PM
You´re both right and wrong.

Yes - you cannot trade first rounders in consecutive. and
No - we don´t have to keep him either.

We can draft and right-away trade the player.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 04:30 PM
Thanks, SJ....appreciate the assist.

So I guess that if we do move up and use the 29thas part of the package..."their guy" would have to be there...very dicey at best. But, in this world, ya' never know.

Ummmmm Ok
06-03-2003, 04:55 PM
Edit: Wrong thread i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif

Dooby
06-03-2003, 05:11 PM
Originally posted by: seelenjaeger
You´re both right and wrong.

Yes - you cannot trade first rounders in consecutive. and
No - we don´t have to keep him either.

We can draft and right-away trade the player.

Basically, the only thing you cannot do is trade your 2003 pick and then trade the 2004 pick before the 2003 draft. But you can trade the 2004 pick immediately after the 2003 draft. We can also trade the 2003 pick today if we wanted to, because the 2002 draft has already transpired.

I think the NBA wanted to prevent a team from trading 2 or 3 consecutive first round picks for a single player or draft pick- the ol' my 1st rounders in '03 (25th overall), '04 & '05 for your '03(no. 2 overall) pick. Why the NBA cares, I don't know. They had no problem taking away 5 consecutive first round picks from Minnisota.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 05:49 PM
Dooby...Do you have a link ?

I'm looking all over the net for the rule....but all I'm finding are the rules for on court play and the CBA stuff...I can't find a thing about trading draft picks.

Dooby
06-03-2003, 06:02 PM
OP, you just needed patience looking through the CBA info.

From Larry Coon (http://members.cox.net/lmcoon/salarycap.htm):

69. How are draft picks handled in trades?

Draft picks (both first and second round) count $0 for salary matching purposes. This is true both before and after the draft. This can make it very difficult to construct a trade that is equitable in both trade value and basketball talent. For example, Vancouver selected Steve Francis with the #2 pick in the 1999 draft, and traded his draft rights to Houston. When the trade was finally engineered, it included three teams (Orlando was also involved), 11 players (including Francis) and two future draft picks.

Once the draft pick signs a contract, his actual salary becomes his trade value.

Note that even though a draft pick's trade value (for salary matching purposes) is $0, the pick is included in the team's team salary at 100% of his scale amount once he is selected in the draft (see questions 38 and 41 ). If an unsigned first round draft pick is traded, then 100% of his scale amount is included in the acquiring team's team salary as soon as the trade is completed.


In addition, teams are restricted from trading away future first round draft picks in consecutive years. This is called the "Ted Stepien Rule." Stepien owned the Cavs from 1980-83, and made a series of bad trades that cost the Cavs several years' first round picks. The trades, as columnist Chris Young put it, "amounted to giving up Manhattan for a bag of beads." As a result of Stepien's ineptitude, teams are now prevented from making trades which might leave them without a future first-round draft pick in consecutive years.

<u>This rule applies only to future first round picks. For example, if this is the 99-00 season, then teams can trade their 2000 first round pick without regard to whether they had a 1999 pick, since their 1999 pick is no longer a future pick. But they can't trade away both their 2000 and 2001 picks, since both are future picks.</u> Teams sometimes work around this rule by trading first round picks in alternate years.

In addition, teams are required to have only a first round pick, and not necessarily their first round pick. So teams may trade away their own future picks in consecutive years if they have another team's first round pick in one of those years.

OutletPass
06-03-2003, 06:04 PM
Excellent research, brother Dooby.

Now please explain "patience" !!

Dooby
06-03-2003, 06:12 PM
Now please explain "patience" !!

It is a song by Guns 'n Roses. Back when the band was good and Izzy Stradlin quietly steered the group in a positive direction with his songwriting and rhythm guitar. Then he left the group because he hated touring and the band turned to crap and couldn't stay together in the same room long enough to tour or record an albumn.

mavsfanforever
06-03-2003, 06:42 PM
Biggest Steal: Carlos Boozer, 35th to Cleveland
Biggest Steal: Gilbert Arenas, 31st to Golden State
Biggest Steal: Michael Redd, 43rd to Milwaukee
Biggest Steal: Emanuel Ginobili, 57th to San Antonio
Biggest Steal: Rashard Lewis, 32nd to Seattle
I think we can safely add Nick Van Exel in that list too.

David
06-03-2003, 08:21 PM
Originally posted by: Dooby

Originally posted by: seelenjaeger
You´re both right and wrong.

Yes - you cannot trade first rounders in consecutive. and
No - we don´t have to keep him either.

We can draft and right-away trade the player.

Basically, the only thing you cannot do is trade your 2003 pick and then trade the 2004 pick before the 2003 draft. But you can trade the 2004 pick immediately after the 2003 draft. We can also trade the 2003 pick today if we wanted to, because the 2002 draft has already transpired.

I think the NBA wanted to prevent a team from trading 2 or 3 consecutive first round picks for a single player or draft pick- the ol' my 1st rounders in '03 (25th overall), '04 & '05 for your '03(no. 2 overall) pick. Why the NBA cares, I don't know. They had no problem taking away 5 consecutive first round picks from Minnisota.

As to why the NBA cares about trading consecutive #1 picks, I think yourdallasmavericks had something to do with that. Back when the Mavs team started out, their main trade partner was the Cavs and they had a real ding-dong running their operation who was trading #1s for some of the players that the Mavs got in the expansion draft. It really got the Mavs team off to a good start by getting extra draft picks. It's been so long, I forget the exact particulars.